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pISSN : 1226-0533 / eISSN : 2713-6388

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2019, Vol.43, No.4

  • 1.

    The effects of Socio-psychological factors of casino staff on the intention of using ERP

    Kim, Ho-Yeon | Yoon Ji-Hwan | 2019, 43(4) | pp.11~31 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    This study investigated the effects of socio-psychological factors such as communication, perceived risk, subjective norms, and perceived ease and perceived usefulness on their intention to use ERP. The results of the analyses showed that communication was a factor to reduce perceived risk, and communication had a positive effect on perceived ease and perceived usefulness. Also, perceived risk had a negative effect on perceived ease and usefulness. In other words, an active and effective education system is important to lower perceived risk, such as the burden or anxiety to use ERP, and to increase the intention to use it. Also, the subjective norm did not have a direct impact on perceived usefulness, but it was found to have impacted on perceived usefulness by mediating image completely. This result suggests that a communication system for lowering perceived risk and systematic and continuous education and a compensation system are needed to recognize the value of active ERP users and to internalize it.
  • 2.

    A Study on the Room Interior Coordination Preference Type of Kids Specialized Rooms with Character: Focusing on Using Q Methodology

    Kim Kyu Mee | Kim, Nam Jo | 2019, 43(4) | pp.33~52 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract
    The purpose of this study is to classify resort room interior coordination preferences of kids’ specialized rooms adopting character marketing by using Q methodology and to identify characteristics based on the types found. This study selected 31 parents of children aged one to six years old as a sample and interviewed them from February 1-15, 2019. The results of the analysis using Q methodology show that there were three types of preferences for room interior coordination for kids. The first type was classified as “safe play and content experience preference,” which reflected a strong desire for safety and content experiences for children's activities. The second group, “character design interior coordination preference,” preferred to have a special feeling towards interior coordination applied with various characters. Finally, the third group, “play experience using small toys and no-screen preference,” preferred hardware-wise room interior coordination that enabled kids to play actively, as opposed to a software-oriented room interior coordination that makes them easily accessible to contents. These findings may contribute to develop a theoretical typology of kids’ specialized rooms based on their subjectivity, and theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
  • 3.

    A Comparison Study of Service Encounter Employees’ Emotional Labor in Hospitality Industry: Hotel versus Airline

    Jinkyung Jenny Kim | wang soo myung | 2019, 43(4) | pp.53~70 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract
    This study compared emotional labor and its influence on burnout and turnover intention between service encounter employees of hotels and airlines. A survey was conducted with hotel and airline employees who had a minimum of one year of work experience in guest service encounters. A total of 287 samples were employed to evaluate the theoretical framework and to test the research hypotheses. The results of the analyses showed that emotional labor was conducted in a different way between hotel and airline employees: hotel employees experienced more deep acting than surface acting, whereas airline employees experienced more surface acting than deep acting. Surface acting of both hotel and airline employees influenced the formation of greater burnout; in contrast, deep acting played a significant role to mitigate burnout. The burnout caused by emotional labor had an effect on increasing turnover intention. Lastly, the moderating effect of hotel versus airline employees was found in the relationship between deep acting and burnout. In particular, hotel employees showed a greater impact to reduce burnout by deep acting. Our findings are meaningful through a comparative analysis of emotional labor between hotel and airline service encounter employees and may be utilized as a fundamental study for hotel and airline companies to strategize for effective emotional labor and to benchmark between different areas.
  • 4.

    Effect of Choice Overload of Travel Product on Purchase Choice Decision: Focus on Moderating Effect of Familarity of the Destination and Purchase Tendency

    Kim, Seong-Jo | 2019, 43(4) | pp.71~90 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract
    The primary objective of this study was to identify whether the choice overload phenomenon exists and investigate why choice overload effect occurs and how it can be attenuated in the tourism industry field. Traditional economic and psychological theories have suggested that having more options is to beneficial to product suppliers to win competitive market environment. However, according to choice overload concept, having too many choice options can sometimes cause consumers to make 'no-choice' or increase perceived choice regret. To achieve of this study, using a scenario method, respondents were randomly assigned to one of six different questionary included scenarios(2destination types × 3choice set). The result of this study showed that having more 16 choices increased the likelihood of making no-choice. However, potential tourism consumers who have familiar with the destination were not influenced by number of choice and they prefer to choice from large assortments. Furthermore, they who have maximizer tendency perceived less choice regret in the large assortments. These findings indicate whether having both familiarity and maximizer tendency are significant predictors of choice overload effect. Based on these results, this study contribute to the academic and practical implications on tourists behavior, travel decision making, and choice overload.
  • 5.

    The Application of Emotional Development Theory to Hotel Intern’s Career Choice Intention

    Park, Seo-Hyeon | Minho Cho | 2019, 43(4) | pp.91~114 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract
    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships among psychological separation, self-identity, internship satisfaction, and hotel career choice intention by applying emotional development theory. In order to test the conceptual model, this study conducted a survey with hotel interns in Seoul. A total of 400 valid surveys were analyzed through structural equation modeling. The results showed that (1) emotional independence of psychological separation affected self-identity; (2) psychological separation did not affect internship satisfaction; (3) psychological separation did not affect hotel career choice intention; (4) self-identity affected internship satisfaction; (5) self-identity affected hotel career choice intention; (6) internship satisfaction affected hotel career choice intention; (7) self-identity had a full mediation effect on the relationship between emotional independence and internship satisfaction; and (8) self-identity had a full mediation effect on the relationship between emotional independence and hotel career choice intention. Ultimately, this study contributes to the advancement of hotel internship research and suggests changes to training for hotel internships.
  • 6.

    Influencing of Content and Non-Content Cues on the Attitude of Hotel Managers’ Knowledge Acquisition Attitude in Online Review: Moderating Role of Title Attractiveness

    Kim Hyo-Young | Yang Sung-Byung | CHUNG NAMHO | 2019, 43(4) | pp.115~138 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    As the role of online word of mouth becomes more important with the development of the Internet, information sharing and diffusion among customers are rapidly taking place. The impact of online reviews, a form of word of mouth, greatly applies to the hotel industry as hotel services are intangible and difficult to evaluate before experiencing, which makes potential customers rely more on online reviews. This study investigated what factors of online hotel reviews affected the knowledge acquisition attitude of hotel managers. This expands the heuristic-systematic model based on prior studies and divides the online hotel reviews into content, non-content, and hybrid cues. Then, this study analyzed the direct and indirect effects of these factors on the knowledge acquisition attitude of hotel managers. The results showed the timeliness of content cues and the amount of review/the rating of the review of non-content cues had a significant effect on the knowledge acquisition attitude of hotel managers. Based on the results, this study suggests both theoretical and practical implications.
  • 7.

    A Study on the Consumption Value, Importance of Selection Attribute and the Purchase Intention of Diabetic Lunch Boxes in Convenience Store

    Choi, Da-Som | Kim, Eun-Ji | Lee, Hyun-Ju and 2other persons | 2019, 43(4) | pp.139~157 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract
    This study intended to identify consumers’ perceptions and purchase intention of diabetic lunch boxes from convenience stores. The research was divided into two studies. Study 1 dealt with the importance and satisfaction of lunch boxes for consumers who had eaten convenience store lunch boxes. Study 2 focused on the diabetic lunch boxes, especially the importance and satisfaction of selection attributes of imaginary diabetic lunch boxes, and it compared perceptions between normal consumers and diabetics. The results found that 70% of diabetics had difficulties eating outside meals. The "quality" and "controllability of sugar" influenced the purchase intention of imaginary diabetic lunch boxes. Considering the number of insufficient studies on consumer perceptions of diabetic lunch boxes, the results could be applied to develop new lunch boxes in convenience stores and to marketing strategies in the healthy food industry.
  • 8.

    Effect of The Food Service Company Located at Tourist Site’s Core Service and Additional Service on Customer Satisfaction: based on Three Factor Theory

    Lee, Sang-Kyung | KIM MIN JOO | 2019, 43(4) | pp.159~177 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract
    The purpose of this study is to understand the logic of the dual-factor theory and the three-factor theory in order to identify salient factors of customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction. In addition, the study identifies three factors from the multi-dimensional perspective in conjunction with the revised core service and additional service model. A pilot study was carried out with two preliminary studies, while the main survey was performed separately for satisfied respondents and overall dissatisfied respondents, respectively. The total sample size was 316, which accounted for 207 satisfied respondents and 109 dissatisfied respondents. From the analyses, the four factors that influenced overall satisfaction and dissatisfaction were identified as follows: 1) core service factor with high differentiation potential affecting both satisfaction and dissatisfaction; 2) core service factor with low differentiation potential affecting only dissatisfaction; 3) additional service with high differentiation potential affecting only satisfaction; and 4) additional service with low differentiation potential affecting only dissatisfaction. These analysis results not only suggest the validity of the three-factor theory of customer satisfaction but also the need for segmentation of core and additional services.
  • 9.

    The Effect of the Characteristics of Festival Participation on the Bonding and Bridging Social Capital

    Jung hun, Kim | 2019, 43(4) | pp.179~199 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    The purpose of this study was to identify the usefulness of subdividing social capital in the study of social capital in the festivals field. Social capital was analyzed by subdividing it into a network perspective. As a result of the analysis, it was confirmed that the influence factors of bonding and bridging social capital were different. Bonding social capital was influenced significantly by participation type and participation experience as capital needed to strengthen community in a group. Bridging social capital was influenced significantly by participation experience, residence area, and residence period as capital needed to expand the relationship. The significance of this study is as follows. First, it is useful to study social capital in festivals by subdividing it into bonding and bridging social capital. Second, participation experiences are important variables that affect both types of social capital. However, the application of measurement items that are not developed for the purpose of festival research remains to be limited.
  • 10.

    An Analysis of Tourism Experience for retired Baby Boomers

    Park, Chang Hwan | Lee, Hoon | 2019, 43(4) | pp.201~227 | number of Cited : 7
    Abstract PDF
    The purpose of this study was to understand the nature of retired baby boomers' tourism experience. The study findings are based on an analysis of 29 in-depth interviews. Five clusters were developed: “threats of ontological security,” “changes in participation in tourism activities,” “changes in the way of tourism,” “transformative tourism experience,” and “reproduction of new meaning of life.” The tourism experience of the baby boom generation is closely linked to the unique and specific social context in which it was constructed and to the unique personal and contextual experience. In particular, the existential anxiety felt in the post-retirement social pressure of baby boomers is overcome through the transformative tourism experience and reflective tourism experience. As such, post-retirement tourism experiences form a positive meaning in an individual's life, affecting self-identity. Finally, the theoretical and practical implications of this study result are discussed.
  • 11.

    Study on Conceptual System of Tourism Ethics using Metaphor Analysis : Focusing on Undergraduate Students taking a Tourism Subject

    Hye-Won, Jang | 2019, 43(4) | pp.229~246 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    The present study aims at understanding undergraduate students' conceptual systems of tourism ethics by metaphor analysis for appropriate direction of the ethics curriculum. For this study, a total of 115 undergraduate students from all grades were asked to describe tourism ethics metaphorically and were asked to write down their reasons for the metaphors they chose. To analyze their metaphors, systemic metaphor analysis was adopted. The results of this study are as follows. First, practical moral-seeking type, interpersonal moral-seeking type, and social moral-seeking type were derived from tourism ethics. Second, there were differences in the characteristics of tourism ethics types according to the major, grade, and gender of undergraduate students. Thus, we suggest that when building an ethics curriculum, planners should consider both the major and gender of the undergraduates, and then develop the instructional methods based on the industrial fields. These results have importance not only as educational guidelines for tourism students but also for informing decisions about the tools that tourism destinations can effectively employ to control the tourism industry.
  • 12.

    An Analysis of Tourism Majors’ Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior toward Sustainable Development

    Min, Chang-Kee | 2019, 43(4) | pp.247~267 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    The present study aims at understanding undergraduate students' conceptual systems of tourism ethics by metaphor analysis for appropriate direction of the ethics curriculum. For this study, a total of 115 undergraduate students from all grades were asked to describe tourism ethics metaphorically and were asked to write down their reasons for the metaphors they chose. To analyze their metaphors, systemic metaphor analysis was adopted. The results of this study are as follows. First, practical moral-seeking type, interpersonal moral-seeking type, and social moral-seeking type were derived from tourism ethics. Second, there were differences in the characteristics of tourism ethics types according to the major, grade, and gender of undergraduate students. Thus, we suggest that when building an ethics curriculum, planners should consider both the major and gender of the undergraduates, and then develop the instructional methods based on the industrial fields. These results have importance not only as educational guidelines for tourism students but also for informing decisions about the tools that tourism destinations can effectively employ to control the tourism industry.