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2017, Vol., No.46

  • 1.

    A study on analysis on the Kamiichidanka aspects of Yodankatsuyō Verb ("Aku" "Karu" "Shimu" "Taru") in the Saikaku's Ukiyōzōshi

    Kim yong kyun | 2017, (46) | pp.7~23 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract
    A study on analysis on the Kamiichidanka aspects of Yodankatsuyō Verb ("Aku" "Karu" "Shimu" "Taru") in the Saikaku's Ukiyōzōshi The purpose of this study is to investigate the meaning of the Kamiichidanka of Yodankatsuyō Verb which is one of the important facts of Japanese translation in the Kamigata Language of Saikaku’s Ukiyōshōshi. In particular, in comparison with the overall tendency in Edo Language, the word ("Aku" "Karu" "Shimu" "Taru") and the utilization type, Continuation type, cadence and delinquency type), and phase (male and female), and examined the cause of the difference. As a result, we could identify some important facts. (1) By word, Kamiichidanka is proceeding in the order of "Karu"> "Shimu"> "Aku" > "Taru" (2) By conjugation types, Kamiichidanka is in progress in the order of Renyōkei> Shuōshi Rentaikei = cadastral and molluscic type (Mizenkei). (3) By phase, Kamiichidanka is proceeding in the order of female language> male language. In other words, the meaning of the Kamiichidanka of the Yodankatsuyō Verb in Saikaku's Ukiyōshō was varied according to the word, usage type and phase In addition, it is confirmed that the above facts, (1) (2) (3) are also consistent with the trends of Edo language in the late period of the late modern era. In particular, since Ukiyōzōshi is a Kamigata Language data, it can be said that Kamigata Language is a part of the trend. In consideration of this point, Kamigata Language and Edo Language is not a separate issue, but it is likely to be a historical change of Japanese language.
  • 2.

    The type of the circumstances reverse of [monowo]

    Miyoung Nam | 2017, (46) | pp.25~40 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    The type of the circumstances reverse of [monowo] The circumstances of [wo], it's caught by the shape that "naka" and "tokoro" of a formal noun touched also, but emphasis is put by an auxiliary verb one in case of "mono". By writing, such, "mono", make the main subject, "nakawo, tokorowo", of the type of the investigation and the sentence pattern of the meaning role which is based on a point of difference, and "monowo". Therefore the object scope of the consideration, "monowo", does the surrounding context put it and turn over focusing on this, it's being analyzed conversantly. circumstances reverse is shown, "monowo", about it's analyzed. The auxiliary verb which functions as mood "mono" and the circumstances are shown, but it was possible to look for the sentence pattern type which is intertwined and becomes semantic interpretation of circumstances reverse each other and understand several systems. Of an auxiliary verb "mono" and the circumstances, that put emphasis on the meaning role and arranged the combination. As a result, the role of the auxiliary verb "mono" is strong by what one should do reverse, the public and inversion, and others are circumstances, it tilted to the one. In other words, "naka, tokoro" of the circumstances that later touches etc. but it's said that there is a common meaning role for the latter. The meaning role of "mono" is more effective, and the former makes the function it doesn't have other formal nouns.
  • 3.

    On Semantic Changes(Ⅰ) of the Repetitive Onomatopée with the alternation of hara and horo -With a Focus on Morphological and Semantic Changes of it Uses in the Ancient through Middle Japanese-

    TAKESHITACHIKA | choi kun sik | 2017, (46) | pp.41~63 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract
    On Semantic Changes(Ⅰ) of the Repetitive Onomatopée with the alternation of hara and horo -With a Focus on Morphological and Semantic Changes of it Uses in the Ancient through Middle Japanese- This diachronically deals with semantic changes of the repetitive onomatopée with the alternation of hara and horo in the Ancient through Middle Japanese. In the Ancient Japanese, the adjectival base hara was productively derivational as shown in the alternation of hara and horo. Since the late 8th century, morphologically and semantically diverse forms have been derived from hara, whose core meaning was assumed to be san (to scatter). During its derivational process, its auditory sense became a fossilized form in the Middle Japanese. hara originally depicted ‘a situation in which some things are scattered’, which was semantically extended to ‘a motion of something falling off or apart’ and further to ‘a motion of a lump breaking into pieces’, which was again extended to ‘an image of something not controlled’ in the Middle Japanese. And in the Middle Japanese, the alternation of voiceless and voiced consonants shows their respective distinctive characteristics in the auditory aspect, but not yet in the visional aspect. Unlike the derivational meanings of hara, the suffix –ri suggests a different image of ‘people behaving frivolously.’
  • 4.

    The meanings and functions of "ura" in modern Japanese

    BAHNG, YOON HYUNG | 2017, (46) | pp.65~80 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract
    The meanings and functions of "ura" in modern Japanese This paper studies the meanings and functions of “ura” in modern Japanese by investigating practical example sentences. It has been hardly studied on “ura” in previous research, but in modern Japanese “ura” has various meanings and functions. In this paper, the usages of “ura" are described in the three cases of meanings and functions: (1) pseudo noun, (2) postposition, and (3) conjunctive particle. The results of the study are presented as follows. First, when “ura" is used as a pseudo noun, it implies the rear or backside. In this meaning, “ura” basically represents a space indicated by a front noun and “N+ura" takes several cases. In this case, “N+ura" functions as a pseudo noun. Second, when “ura" is used as a postposition, it implies the inside facts from a point indicated by a front noun. In this case, the form of “ura" is limited to “N+urawo”, “N+urani", and “N+urade”, and then “N+ura" functions as a postposition. Third, when “ura" is used as a conjunctive particle, it represents the inside facts from a point indicated by a front verb. In this case, the form of “ura" is only limited to “V+urani", and then “V+ura" functions as a conjunctive particle. In conclusion, “ura” is used as a postposition or a conjunctive particle, although its basic function is a pseudo noun and it represents a space in modern Japanese. As a postposition or a conjunctive particle, “ura” shows significant changes in both aspects of formats and meanings.
  • 5.

    A Study on the configuration and formation of Dutch in the end of 18th century Focusing on Rangakukaitei(蘭學階梯)the second volume(卷下)

    Yi, Keun Sang | 2017, (46) | pp.81~101 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract
    A Study on the configuration and formation of Dutch in the end of 18thcentury Focusing on Rangakukaitei(蘭學階梯)the second volume(卷下) Modern Japan came across Western language through the interchange of early 17th Western culture and internal and external events that had happened in Japan. At that moment what Japan needed most was the well-understanding of Western people’s language. The necessity of Dutch grew high as Japan had more contact with the Dutch and in result professional interpreter, who is an expert in speaking and translating Dutch, begun to appear. Since then translating and interpreting the Dutch language took concrete form. However, there had not been found any specific methodical data on how to study the Dutch Language but only a few fragmentary document had been left and that was Rangakukaitei 1788 which was established after Oszki Gentagu had been studying abroad. This book, established by Otsuki Gentaku(大槻玄沢), was an introductory manual of Dutch language explaining the letters and numbers of Dutch which was widely used as an guide book on Dutch. This book had given a quite influence on propagating Dutch language in Japan later on. We will overview the characteristics of how Dutch language has been studied in the late 18thcentury through this Rangakukaitei content and composition. Furthermore, we will examine how Japan’s traditional method of learning foreign language has been reflected and see how other feature may influence in studying foreign language.
  • 6.

    Topic management in Japanese and Korean conversation between close friends -Topic components and narrative openings from the perspectives of politeness-

    JANG YUN AH | 2017, (46) | pp.103~125 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract
    Topic management in Japanese and Korean conversation between close friends -Topic components and narrative openings from the perspectives of politeness- This study examines Korean and Japanese differences in politeness strategy focused on topic components and narrative openings in casual conversation between close friends. The results of the study are summarized as follows. (A) The topic components differed between Japanese and Korean conversation. In Japanese conversation, more number of topics based on common knowledge have been observed than Korean conversation, while more personal topics which consist of one participant's narrative have been observed in Korean conversation. (B) When topics developed by only one narrater, self initiated openings predominate in Japanese conversation, on the contrary, other initiated openings were more common in Korean conversation. (C) These results have led to the suggestion that the difference in degree of stepping into other's personal space and self-presentation causes different politeness strategy usages in Japanese and Korean conversation between close friends.
  • 7.

    A Study on the Active Knowledge Construction of Japanese Learners -Phase III class that uses questionnaires-

    KIM TAE HEE | 2017, (46) | pp.127~147 | number of Cited : 4
    Abstract
    A Study on the Active Knowledge Construction of Japanese Learners -Phase III class that uses questionnaires- This study adopt key insight from behaviorism, cognitivism and constructivism so as to construct a learning environment required for Korean learners of the Japanese. The “active learners” proposed by constructivism signifies that they are beings who actively select information, and if learners recognize in class “the boundary between what they know and what they do not” on their own, such a recognition plays a role of “a social context,” helping leaners identify necessary information. The proposed classes were executed based on such a hypothesis that this recognition helps learners’ active selection among information on offer. As an example in which class activities can help integrate and regularly introduce both traditional lecture-based and constructivism-based classes, the study in Phase I conducted a survey with a questionnaire so as hep learners recognize the boundary between what they know and do not know. In Phase II, the study used a traditional lecture-based class, and in Phase III, the study had the learners complete the questionnaire used in Phase I again so as to confirm the result of knowledge construction. Through the “Phase III class that uses questionnaires,” the study reported and evaluated the result.