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pISSN : 2466-0787

2020 KCI Impact Factor : 0.9
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2020, Vol.6, No.2

  • 1.

    The Detection of PTSD Malingering Using an Implicit Memory Task

    Na Ri Im | Yunkyeung, Choi | 2020, 6(2) | pp.117~138 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance in implicit memory task and several subjective reports measuring symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and positive and negative affects among a PTSD malingering group, an analogue trauma group and a control group. A 3×2×2 mixed-design method was used. Group (malingered PTSD vs. analogue trauma vs. control) was between-subjects factor and word emotionality (trauma vs. neutral words) and word familiarity (high vs. low) in word-stem completion task were within-subjects factors. The participants were 90 college students, comprising 30 individuals per group. Participants initially performed a word-stem completion task and then completed the self-report measures. The results showed that malingering subjects scored significantly higher in the negative emotions than for analogue trauma and control subjects. Significant two-way interactions were found for group × word familiarity and group × word emotionality. These results suggest that implicit memory tasks can be used in the detection of PTSD malingering. The limitations of this study are discussed along with suggestions for further research.
  • 2.

    The Relationship between Suicidal Ideation and Depression, Daily Stress, and Neurotic Tendencies in High School Students

    Bo-Kyung Choo | Park Joong Kyu | 2020, 6(2) | pp.139~152 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    This study aimed to find out the relationship between depression, daily stress, and neurotic tendencies as a contributing factor to adolescents’ suicidal ideation. It conducted survey twice over three months as a short-term longitudinal design. It was designed to find out the changes and factors that affect suicidal ideation in adolescents. 427 male and female high school students in four high schools in Daegu and North Gyeongsang Province collected data consisting of suicide ideation scale, depression scale, daily stress scale, and neurotic tendency scale. The current status of suicidal ideation surveyed across gender and grade, there were no differences. Correlational and hierarchical regression analysis were performed to identify the factors that affect suicidal ideation at time 1 and 2 which are the main concerns. The results were as follows; There were significant positive correlations among suicidal ideation, depression, daily stress, and neurotic tendencies. According to the hierarchical regression analysis at time 1, depression, daily stress, and neurotic tendencies led them to suicidal ideation. The suicidal ideation at time 2 showed a significant amount of explanation in the order of suicidal ideation at time 1, depression, daily stress, and neurotic tendencies. However, the suicidal ideation between time 1 and 2 was maintained for three months without change. Based on these findings, we discussed current issues and suggestions for further research.
  • 3.

    Emotional Recognition via Voices of Individuals with Autistic Traits

    Minji Cho | Song, Hyunjoo | 2020, 6(2) | pp.153~170 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    This study aimed to examine how emotional recognition from voices differs in individuals with autistic traits. A total of 1,016 male and female college students who completed surveys measuring autistic traits were included. The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) and the Empathy Quotient (EQ) were administered to measure autistic traits. Participants were divided into upper and lower groups, according to their autistic traits. A total of 34 (male=16, female=18) participants, including 16 from the upper group and 18 from the lower group, were selected. Vocal stimuli, which can be divided into two types, were used to measure auditory emotion recognition. Stimulus 1, which was created by the researcher, is used to examine complex emotions, and stimulus 2 is used to measure both basic and complex emotions. There were no significant differences in the ability to recognize basic emotions among the groups. However, the ability to recognize complex emotions was statistically significant depending on whether context was provided or not. This study’s clinical implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed.
  • 4.

    Multiple Mediating Effects of Time Perspective in the Influence of Complex Trauma Experiences on Traumatized Identity

    Da Hyeon Kim | Baek Yong Mae | 2020, 6(2) | pp.171~188 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    This study aimed to to investigate the multiple mediating effects of time perspective on the influence of complex trauma experiences on traumatized identity. A survey was conducted on men and women aged 18 to 35 in Daegu and Gyeongbuk provinces and analyzed using the SPSS PROCESS macro to verify the multiple mediating effects. The Trauma Antecedents Questionnaire, Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, and Traumatized Identity Questionnaire were used. The main results were as follows: first, complex trauma experiences were found to be positively related to past negative time perspective, present fatalistic time perspective, traumatized identity, and negatively related to past positive time perspective and future time perspective. Additionally, traumatized identity was found to be positively related to past negative time perspective and present fatalistic time perspective, and negatively related to past positive time perspective and future time perspective. Second, past negative time perspective, past positive time perspective, present fatalistic time perspective, and future time perspective had multiple mediating effects of complex trauma experiences on traumatized identity, although the present hedonistic time perspective had no multiple mediating effects. The academic and clinical implications of this study’s results were discussed based on the existentialism.