Korean | English

pISSN : 2233-9221 / eISSN : 2713-8720

2020 KCI Impact Factor : 0.08
Aims & Scope
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T&I Review is a new international refereed journal that seeks to promote the development of translation and interpretation studies, effective T&I education, and excellence in professional practice by sharing the results of systematic and innovative research. It aims to play a key role in the following areas: 1) global dissemination of research results in T & I studies, 2) communication regarding the latest developments in the field, and 3) consolidation of an international network of practitioners, educators, and researchers in the T & I field.   T&I Review is published annually by the Ewha Research Institute for Translation Studies (ERITS) of the Graduate School of Translation and Interpretation(GSIT) at Ewha Womans University. T&I Review welcomes contributions not only from seasoned practitioners and scholars, but also from young researchers and educators in the field. It publishes original research-based articles, research notes, literature reviews, commentaries, book reviews, and dissertation abstracts (MA and PhD). To tap into the wisdom and expertise of veteran practitioners, T&I Review also publishes practical articles from practitioners' reflection on their practice.
Editor-in-Chief
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Juriae Lee

(GSTI, Ewha Womans University)

Citation Index
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  • KCI IF(2yr) : 0.08
  • KCI IF(5yr) : 0.19
  • Centrality Index(3yr) : 0.475
  • Immediacy Index : 0.0

Current Issue : 2021, Vol.11, No.1

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  • How the food names in A Dream of Red Mansions translated into Korean

    JINTIANXIANG | 2021, 11(1) | pp.7~34 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Machine translation powered by artificial intelligence is now beingwidely used for such areas as legal translation, which require high-levelprofessional knowledge and skills and thus were used to be considered exclusivelyfor human translators. The Korea Legislation Research Institute, which hastranslated the statutes of the Republic of Korea for 30 years, has begun to usemachine translation. Yet there are issues to be addressed, including legal problemsassociated with using machine translation. If we could come up with a propersolution to these issues based on in-depth research, machine translation would betterassist human translators. (Korea Legislation Research Institute, Korea)
  • Practices and challenges in translating statutes using machine translation

    Lee, Sang-Mo | 2021, 11(1) | pp.35~56 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Machine translation powered by artificial intelligence is now beingwidely used for such areas as legal translation, which require high-levelprofessional knowledge and skills and thus were used to be considered exclusivelyfor human translators. The Korea Legislation Research Institute, which hastranslated the statutes of the Republic of Korea for 30 years, has begun to usemachine translation. Yet there are issues to be addressed, including legal problemsassociated with using machine translation. If we could come up with a propersolution to these issues based on in-depth research, machine translation would betterassist human translators. (Korea Legislation Research Institute, Korea)
  • Problems in non-native speakers' communication in legal sttings: Two cases of U.S. police interviews with suspects

    Jieun Lee | 2021, 11(1) | pp.57~86 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    This paper examinescommunication problems or miscommunication in legal settings. When theparticipants in the communicative interaction do not share similar linguistic andcultural backgrounds, they are more likely to create misunderstanding or developmiscommunication. Non-native speakers with limited linguistic resources arerestricted from fully participating in legal communication, where understanding andclarity is vital. Their linguistic disfluency and deviations from the so-called standardEnglish may cause serious misunderstanding that have legal ramifications. Based ona discourse analysis of video-recorded US police interviews, this paper examinesmiscommunication during the investigative interviews with suspects from Koreanspeaking backgrounds, which involved two non-professional interpreters. While bothof them were Korean-American police offciers, they differed in terms of the extentof the provision of interpreting. In one case, the interpreter played a very minimalrole as an interpreter during the interview, while the suspect largely managedcommunication in English on his own, and this contributed to the lack of certaintyover his confession to the crime and eventually led to his acquittal. In the othercase, the interpreter interpreted throughout the investigative interview of the suspectbut her interpreting added to the complexity of the communication problem, mainlydue to her lack of interpreting skills. It is argued that given that a greater
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