Health Communication Research 2021 KCI Impact Factor : 0.33

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pISSN : 2093-2707 / eISSN : 2671-5856

http://journal.kci.go.kr/hcr
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2021, Vol.20, No.2

  • 1.

    Effects of Women’s Empowerment and Media Use on the Maternal Acceptance of Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions

    LEE JIYUN , Jung, Minsoo | 2021, 20(2) | pp.1~27 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Non-pharmaceutic interventions (NPIs; handwashing, wearing mask, or maintaining social-distances) used to delay the peak of the epidemic, allowing time for vaccines distribution. We investigated determinants affecting NPIs in terms of maternal health. The datasets came from computer-assisted web survey that was conducted on married women who aged from 20-40 years old and who are living in Seoul, Beijing and Tokyo with underage children (n=1,571). We applied multi-logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders. In Seoul, mothers with high-empowerment are more likely to practice handwashing (95% CI: 1.234-2.097) and more likely to wear masks (95% CI: 1.009-1.542). In Beijing, mothers with high-empowerment are more likely to practice social-distancing (95% CI: 1.040-1.727), handwashing (95% CI: 1.813-3.343), and to wear masks (95% CI: 1.054-1.756). In Tokyo, mothers with high-empowerment are more likely to practice social-distancing (95% CI: 1.214-1.976), handwashing (95% CI: 1.113-1.776), and to wear masks (95% CI: 1.046-1.660). The moderating effect of media use was only partially identified. In Beijing, the more mothers watched TV, the more likely they were to practice social-distancing (95% CI: 1.180-1.969), and more likely to wear a mask (95% CI: 1.183-2.015). We found that women's empowerment is the strongest and most consistent factor determining whether NPIs are accepted. Therefore, in order to cope with Covid-X, health education and media literacy campaigns that enhance women's empowerment from the perspective of maternal health may be necessary.