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pISSN : 1598-4230 / eISSN : 2586-7601

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2017, Vol., No.56

  • 1.

    A Study on the Effectiveness of Ethical Leadership

    Junho Jang | 2017, (56) | pp.5~32 | number of Cited : 4
    Abstract PDF
    This study investigates the effects of ethical leadership on identification and identification on subordinates’ job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Additionally this study examines moderating effect of team solidarity on relationship between ethical leadership and identification and mediating effect of identification on the relationship between ethical leadership and subordinates’ job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Data from 439 employees in 12 different companies show that ethical leadership positively relates to identification and identification positively relates to subordinates’ job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Also result shows that team solidarity moderates the relationship between ethical leadership and identification and identification mediates the relationship between ethical leadership and subordinates’ job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Implications of the research findings are discussed, and recommendation for future research are provided.
  • 2.

    Validation and Analysis of a Human Rights Sensitivity Scale

    Park, Hye-sook | Yang, Sang-hee | 2017, (56) | pp.33~58 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract PDF
    This study validated a human rights sensitivity scale developed in 2002 by Mun Young-Rin et al. Using a local university student sample in the Republic of Korea, it investigated college students’ level of human rights sensitivity and analyzed possible correlates such as gender, year-in-school experience, human rights-related education experience, perceived level of Korean society’s human rights consciousness, identification with the concept of global citizenship, and sense of community. Results from exploratory factor analysis, multitrait–multimethods, and a Rasch measurement model indicate that using the sum of human rights-sensitive individual item mean scores for each individual episode in the survey is more valid than using difference scores obtained by deducting human rights-irrelevant item scores from human rights-sensitive items for each individual episode as suggested by Mun et al. The study found that elements of individual scale scores were distinctively associated with gender, year-in school, experience of human rights education, identification with the concept of global citizenship, perceived level of Korean society’s human rights consciousness, and sense of community. The information obtained can be utilized for developing programs to enhance college students' human rights consciousness and human rights sensitivity. In particular, based on MANCOVA results emphasizing sense of community as a statistically significant covariate of human rights sensitivity, the analysis indicates that enhancing sense of community is crucial for enhancing human rights sensitivity in a multicultural and globalized society.
  • 3.

    Korean Voters’ Reaction to an Election Campaign Using Big Data

    Kim, Hak-Ryang | 2017, (56) | pp.59~77 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    This study analyzes how Korean voters think about candidates use their information or opinions they left on SNS. For this study, a telephone survey of Korean adults was conducted in 2015. For this study, the total sample of the survey is 1,000 which was proportionally extracted by gender, age, and region. The statistical analysis methods for hypothesis verification in this study are the logistic regression analysis and the cross-tabulations. The results show that 56.5% of Korean voters do not agree that candidates use their information or opinions they left on SNS. It means that election campaign based on the big data may not possible yet. In the analysis of age group, only the people in their 20s and 30s turn out to have a significant relationship with candidates' using their information on SNS. Since people in their 30s have a higher rate of the practical user of SNS than those in their 20s, they agree candidates' use their information or opinions they left on SNS more than 20s. In the analysis of residence both urban and rural residents turn out to have a significant relationship with candidates' using their information on SNS. Since rural residents have a higher rate of the practical user of SNS than urban residents, they agree candidates' use their information or opinions they left on SNS more than urban residents. In the analysis of political orientation, sex and education, they all turn out to have no significant relationship with candidates' using their information on SNS.
  • 4.

    Wounds and Healing of Defectors

    CHAE YOUNG KIM | 2017, (56) | pp.79~95 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    The purpose of this paper is to look at the wounds suffered by North Korean refugees and to prepare measures to heal them. First, we examined the reality of mass production of North Korean defectors and examined why North Koreans are forced to defect. Next, I examined the pain and hurts that North Korean residents suffered during the process of defecting and the process of settlement after defecting. The refugees wear many wounds, from the escape to the settling, and after the settling, including the confusion of the identity in the change of environment and the trials inside and outside. It is meaningful to have experience of healing prior to confusion which will happen to the North and South Koreans after unification. This article suggests that Christianity and Buddhism in South and North Korea can play their own roles in the process of healing the wounds of the refugees. Unification is not something to be covered only in the politics and economy. There must be a policy and consideration for people who are subjects of politics and who are subjects of the economy. Healing and caring for members of the South and the North who are wounded in the process of unification are most important in the policy of unification.
  • 5.

    Korean Unification and Global Public Goods

    Jaechun Kim | 2017, (56) | pp.97~114 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Much of the discussion on the Korean Unification and its values have revolved around economic and security benefits that the unification would bring to people on the Korean peninsula and Northeast Asia. The paper claims that the benefits of the Korean Unification would go beyond the Korean peninsula and Northeast Asia; it goes to the international community. Therefore, the Korean Unification would be a world historical event that could contribute to the international community. More specifically, the Korean Unification can contribute to many issue areas of international relations such as non-proliferation, human rights, environmental protection, human trafficking and money laundering, etc. Korean peninsula has been one of the major zones of conflicts in the world. By resolving the conflicts on the Korean peninsula, the unification can impart a positive message to the world that seemingly intractable conflicts can be resolved if we put in good faith efforts. Successful unification on the Korean peninsula means that two very different societies – one that is quite rich and the other, very poor – can be integrated into one society with proper policies. The Korean Unification can work as a model for solving polarization of incomes and inequalities associated with unfettered advance of Globalization. Emphasizing the nature of the Korean Unification as international public goods would enhance our public diplomacy efforts to elicit international support the Korea’s unification policy.
  • 6.

    Smartphone Addiction and the Current Status of Smartphone Usage among Korean Adolescents

    Kitai Kim | 2017, (56) | pp.115~142 | number of Cited : 10
    Abstract PDF
    It has almost become a cliché to say that the influence of the smartphone has become more crucial than ever before. The purpose of this study was to investigate the current status of smartphone usage in Gwangju, Korean adolescents. This study was focused on smartphone addiction, considering that the overuse of the smartphone could result in some serious problems. A total of 1,796 middle and high school students in South Korea completed the structured questionnaire. Around half of responders answered that the first time of smartphone use was 4~6 grades of elementary school; 61.3% of adolescents firstly used smartphone when they were elementary school students. The most frequent time period and area of smartphone use were from 9 pm to 12 am and SNS, respectively. The monthly expense of smartphone use was 30,000~40,000 KRW. The proportion of addicted adolescents was 19.9% (n = 357). Gender and academic achievement were significant factors associated with smartphone addiction; girls were more addicted than boys while students with high academic achievement showed lower addiction than the other students.