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2018, Vol.18, No.6

  • 1.

    Experience and perception of sexual harassment during clinical practice among dental hygiene students

    조혜은 | Bo-Ram Lee | 2018, 18(6) | pp.1003~1012 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to contribute to the provision of a safe practice environment and practical sexual harassment prevention education for dental hygiene students who practice clinically. Methods: A total of 260 students with experience in clinical practice at dental hygiene colleges and universities in Gwangju and Jeonnam was included in this study. From May 1, 2018 to June 30, 2018, subjects were surveyed about sexual harassment experience, sexual harassment related information, self-esteem, and self-assertiveness. Statistical analysis was performed by frequency analysis, independent t-test, Mann-Whitney test, one way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis. Results: In the sexual harassment survey revealed that 64.3% of offenders were patients and 50.0% of the offenders were in their 40s. A total of 78.6% of the offenders reported harassment in hospital type “dental clinics.” Most respondents disclosed that “I did not do anything” (60.7%). Psychologically, 75.0% felt “shame and insult.” Self-esteem was high in the fourth grade (3.68). Self-esteem and self-assertiveness were higher among those with no sexual harassment experiences (131.77 and 132.81, respectively; p<0.05). Correlation analysis indicated that self-esteem and self-assertiveness were correlated (r=0.509, p<0.01). Factors influencing the perception of sexual harassment include: three to four months of clinical practice (β=0.361), experience of sexual harassment (β=-0.551), and self-esteem (β=0.503). Conclusions: It is necessary to provide systematic and diverse information to address sexual harassment. A proper perception of what constitute sexual harassment in clinical practice is also relevant. Furthermore, practical sexual harassment prevention education program should be developed and implemented.
  • 2.

    Analysis of dental radiography phantom practice of dental hygiene students

    Won Bok-Yun | Mi-Yeong Hwang | Jang Gye Won and 3other persons | 2018, 18(6) | pp.1013~1023 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate dental hygiene students’ recognition of safety management and phantom practice in dental radiology. Methods: The study subjects were 409 students in six regions who completed a dental radiology practice course and had on-job experience more than once. After understanding the study purpose and contents, they answered a questionnaire. The main jobs in dental radiology were analyzed. Results: As a result, regarding the most difficult aspects of dental radiology practice, “it is impossible to irradiate the mouth directly with X-rays” was the most common response (29.1%). Regarding the question “what is the main role of students in dental radiology practice?”, the answer “it is shooting simulations using phantoms” accounted for 59.7% of responses. The most difficult regions in bisecting and paralleling radiography with a phantom were found to be the maxillary & mandibular molars and premolars. The most difficult technique was reported to be locating XCP maintenance to fit inside the mouth for both molars and premolars. The most difficult region to perform bitewing radiography using the phantom was the molar region (2.87), and the most difficult to perform occlusal radiography approaches were maxillary anterior general occlusal radiography (2.92) and mandibular cross-sectional occlusal radiography (3.00). Conclusions: The most technically difficult point in bitewing and occlusal radiography was the correct positioning of the vertical and horizontal angles. Radiography practice was considered to be more effective than previous mutual practice in terms of analysis of anatomical structures and patient treatment methods. Therefore, it will be necessary to improve policy regarding dentalradiography practice at the department of dental hygienics and revise the necessary laws andregulations.
  • 3.

    Moderating effect of self-esteem and depression on the correlation between the frequency of community volunteer activities and job consciousness in dental hygiene students

    Marcia H. Lorentzen | Young-soo LEE | 장종화 | 2018, 18(6) | pp.1025~1035 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study examined dental hygiene students' frequency of participation in community volunteer activities, job consciousness, depression, and self-esteem, and then identified the correlation among them. We also analyzed the moderating effect of depression and self-esteem on the correlation between participation in community volunteer activities and job consciousness. Methods: We surveyed 312 dental hygiene students attending four universities in South Chungcheong Province, Korea, from May 2 to June 15, 2016, through direct visits. They were given structured questionnaires containing four items on community volunteer activities, three on job consciousness, ten on self-esteem, and 13 on depression. To examine the moderating effect of depression and self-esteem, we performed analysis of variance, correlation analysis, and structural equation modeling analysis (based on the path analysis model and by inserting interaction terms) using SPSS and AMOS. Results: We observed a negative correlation between self-esteem and depression (r=-0.062) but a positive correlation between self-esteem and job consciousness (r=0.125). Depression and job consciousness had a negative correlation (r=-0.176). Depression had a statistically significant impact on job consciousness (r=-0.519, p<0.01). The interaction term between depression and frequency of community volunteer activities also had a statistically significant influence on job consciousness (r=0.090, p<0.05). These findings indicate that depression moderates the correlation between frequency of community volunteer activities and job consciousness at a statistically significant level. Conclusions: More frequent participation in volunteer activities enhances dental hygiene students' self-esteem, reduces depression, and raises job consciousness. The positive impact of volunteering on self-esteem, depression, and job consciousness warrants encouraging students' participation in community volunteer activities, creating supportive structures, and developingvarious volunteer programs relevant to the students' area of study.
  • 4.

    Effect of translucency on CAD/CAM ceramic according to different core/veneer thickness

    강월 | Kim Ji Hwan | 2018, 18(6) | pp.1037~1045 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluation the effect of translucency on CAD/CAM ceramic according to different core/veneer thicknesses. Methods: A total of 42 samples from 2 groups of 7 ceramic cores, each with 3 thickness values (0.8, 1.0, 1.2 mm) were manufactured. The veneers were also manufactured in 3 thicknesses (0.3, 0.5, 0.7 mm). The group names were based on the name of the ceramic core (IPS e.Max CAD; LD, and IPS Empress CAD; LR). The associated number was determined by the combined thickness of the core and veneer: 1 = (0.8 + 0.7); 2 = (1.0 + 0.5); 3 = (1.2 + 0.3). The translucency was measured using a spectrophotometer and defined via the contrast ratio (CR) and translucency parameter (TP). Two-way ANOVA was performed to compare the 2 groups (material and thickness). Results: As the core thickness increased, the TP value also increased, and the CR value (for LR group) decreased. The results of 2-way ANOVA demonstrated that the thicknesses of different core/veneer combinations significantly affected the translucency (p<0.05). Conclusions: The different core and veneer thicknesses affected the translucency of CAD/CAM ceramic.
  • 5.

    Comparison of author key words and Medical Subject Heading terms in the Journal of Korean Society of Dental Hygiene from 2001 to 2015

    Kim Yun Jeong | 2018, 18(6) | pp.1047~1055 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the author key words and MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms in the Journal of Korean Society of Dental Hygiene (JKSDH). Methods: A total of 3,242 author key words from 974 informative articles published from 2001 to 2015 were compared with MeSH terms, according to the criteria of complete coincidence, incomplete coincidence, and complete non-coincidence. Results: The coincidence rate of 564 author key words with MeSH terms was 17.4%. The author key words that appeared most frequently (in descending order) were oral health (41 times), dental hygienists (30 times), dental caries (29 times), and knowledge (29 times). There was a non-coincidence rate of 70.5% for 2,286 author key words with MeSH terms. Conclusions: Many author key words used in the JKSDH did not coincide with MeSH terms. The use of author key words that coincide with MeSH terms is necessary to accomplish the international journal.
  • 6.

    Influencing factors on turnover intention in clinical dental hygienist

    Choi Hye-Jung | Jung jung hwa | 주금미 | 2018, 18(6) | pp.1057~1066 | number of Cited : 6
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to provide a reference material for improving the work environment to reduce the turnover intention of clinical dental hygienists in the future by identifying the problem of the turnover phenomenon of clinical dental hygienists in Seoul and Gyeonggi-do. Methods: The method of this study used the raw data of ‘A Survey on the Current Work Environment of Clinical Dental Hygienists’ from August 29 to September 28, 2017, and 2,974 clinical dental hygienists in Seoul and Gyeonggi-do were finally selected as the study subjects. Results: The results showed that excessive workload, inadequate pay, and hierarchical organizational culture of a workplace were the main factors influencing the turnover intention of clinical dental hygienists, and the lack of welfare system, low wage and practical experience also affected their turnover intention. Conclusions: In order to reduce the turnover intention of clinical dental hygienists, it is important to create a working atmosphere where the members of an organization can freely share and communicate suggestions and improvements, and to pay their salary appropriate to the duties and roles of dental hygienists, and accordingly they will be able to carry out the duties with responsibility for a long time without moving to another organization.
  • 7.

    The opinions of some local clinical dental hygienists on medical personnel of dental hygienists

    Ryu, Hae Gyum | 2018, 18(6) | pp.1067~1077 | number of Cited : 6
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of the study is to investigate the opinions of some local clinical dental hygienists on medical personnel of dental hygienists. It will be for provide the Future dental hygienist basic data necessary for medical personnel. Methods: A self-reported questionnaire was completed by 171 dental hygienists in Busan and Gyeongnam from December 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018. Structured questionnaires were uesd for analysis. The questionnaire consisted of general characteristics of the subjects(7 items), medical personnel necessity and opinions of dental hygienist(2 items), the opinions of distinction of the task between dental hygienists and other personnel(2 items), many frequency task in the dental clinic. The collected data were analyzed using frequency, percentage, descriptive statistics and ANOVA using IBM SPSS VER 20.0. Results: 89.5% of the dental hygienists required medical personnel of dental hygienist, the opinions on the necessity were as follows: 'role and quality improvement as oral health professionals', 'lack of legislation and application of dental hygienists duties'. There was no difference reason between dental hygienists and other personnel on duties, the reason were investigated to uncertainty of dental hygienist system, lack of dental hygienist workforce, dentists lack awareness of dental hygienist expertise. There was surveyed by the current many frequency duties in the dental clinic, assist for dental treatment, Oral health education and counselling, Preventive dental treatment. Conclusions: Legal guarantees for clinical dental hygienists work are absolutely required. Therefore, relevant government agencies and related organizations should resolve the contradiction of the legal system of medical law and medical technicians. The clinical dental hygienists should be promoted to medical personnel through the amendment of the medical law so that the duties practiced by the dental hygienist can be matched with the legal practice.
  • 8.

    Effects of oral health knowledge, attitude, and behavior on oral health impact profile of metabolic syndrome patients

    Lim Mi Hee | 2018, 18(6) | pp.1079~1090 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study aims to provide fundamental data on seeking more effective programs for metabolic syndrome patients’ oral health by researching their knowledge, attitude and behaviors on oral health and considering the effects each factor has on the oral health impact profile. Methods: The research was conducted on 155 patients with metabolic syndrome who visited the metabolic syndrome center of S district between July 19th, 2016 and August 27th, 2016. Results: When the subjects had experiences of oral treatment within the past year, which indicated lower quality of life in relation to oral health. Oral health knowledge had a positive correlation with oral health attitude (0.241) and oral health behaviors (0.362), had a negative correlation with oral health impact profile (-0.283). Oral health attitude showed a positive correlation with oral health behaviors (0.476) (p<0.001). Conclusions: By conducting a oral health promotion business among metabolic syndrome patients including a oral care and treatment program which aim to enhance the oral knowledge, attitude and behaviors and comprehensively manage the oral health education program, it is expected that their quality of life related to oral health could be further improved.
  • 9.

    Survey on the working environment of national clinical dental hygienists

    Kang Hyeon Suk | Jung Young Ran | 조윤영 | 2018, 18(6) | pp.863~878 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to investigate the regional distribution and working environment of clinical dental hygienists in Korea. Methods: From 2015 to October 2016, a questionnaire was completed by 5,708 participants and the data were analyzed. Results: The region with the largest increase in clinical dental hygienist employees compared to graduates is Seoul. More than 50.0% of clinical dental hygienists working for less than 1.8 million won in the payroll period of 4-6 years were working in the Gwangju Jeonnam, Jeonbuk, and Gangwon regions. In addition, incentives and bonuses were rarely provided by localities and agencies. Although 43.4% provided both parental leave and maternity leave. Conclusions: In order to solve the fundamental problem of inter-regional movement and employee turnover rate of clinical dental hygienists, as well as address the regional imbalance in labor supply and demand, efforts should be made for institutional improvement to strengthen management and implementation.
  • 10.

    Factors affecting the job embeddedness of clinical dental hygienists

    kim young im | Jang, yun jung | 2018, 18(6) | pp.879~889 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study aimed to provide basic data to establish a foundation for efficient operation of the organization by identifying the factors that affect the job embeddedness of dental hygienists. Methods: A survey was conducted from March to July 2018, targeting dental hygienists working in dental clinics and hospitals. Results: The study of the factors affecting job embeddedness of dental hygienists revealed that along with career, marital status, surface acting of emotional labor, and even emotional hiding and false expression, which are sub-areas of the surface acting, have statistically significant influences on job embeddedness. In other words, in a married dental hygienist with relatively high work experience, the surface acting of emotional labor is found to be high in job embeddedness, and the explanatory power of the model is approximately 53.2%. Conclusions: In order to improve the job embeddedness of clinical dental hygienists, it seems necessary to prepare an effective program to strengthen the surface behavior of emotional labor.
  • 11.

    Dental hygiene curriculum proposals to improve the ability of dental hygienists as medical professionals

    이은선 | Jung Jae Yeon | Ha Jung Eun and 2other persons | 2018, 18(6) | pp.891~902 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to propose contents of a curriculum and training program for dental hygienists as medical professionals by surveying the opinions of clinical dental hygienists and dental hygiene professors. Methods: The subjects were 192 clinical dental hygienists and 193 dental hygiene professors. They answered questionnaires that consisted of grading each task based on its importance: a) for dental hygiene students to learn, b) to perform autonomously in clinical practice, and c) the expectancy of the task to change when dental hygienists become medical professionals. Data analysis was performed using an independent sample T test to capture differences between clinical dental hygienists and dental hygiene professors. The terms in the answers of open-ended questionnaires were extracted. We used R 3.5.0, R Recommender, and Wordcloud software packages. Results: Calculus removal had the highest scores for dental hygiene students to learn and expectancy to change when dental hygienists become medical professionals. Physiotherapy of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), planning, performing, and assessment of community oral health programs had the lowest scores in autonomy in clinical practice. The dental hygiene professors gave higher scores in most of the tasks for dental hygiene students to learn, autonomy in clinical practice, and expectancy to change, than did clinical dental hygienists. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), job ethics, and communication were the most frequently mentioned terms in the training as medical professionals program contents. Conclusions: In the future, it will be necessary to study thecurriculum to improve the proficiency of dental hygienists as medical professionals.
  • 12.

    Oral health factors affecting the nutritional status of the elderly

    Jung Yun Sook | 2018, 18(6) | pp.903~910 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The study aimed to identify the oral health factors that affect the nutritional status of the elderly. Methods: The study was conducted over ten months from September 2013 to June 2014, and included senior citizens who were supported by the visiting health service. The rate of saliva release, the number of remaining teeth, and the ability of the elderly to identify nutritional conditions were evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed using the t-test, ANOVA, and multiple linear regression using SAS 9.4 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USA.). Results: The study participants had an average irritation saliva secretion rate of 2.26 ± 1.11 mg per minute. The higher the rate of saliva secretion, the higher the mini nutritional assessment (MNA) score (p<0.001). The average number of remaining teeth was 8.21 ± 9.76. The MNA scores were highest in groups with 11 or more remaining teeth (p=0.001). The factors that affected the nutritional condition of the elderly were their ability to perform activities of daily living, saliva flow rate, and number of remaining teeth. The highest correlation among them was that of the standardized regression coefficient was – 0.386 by activity daily living , followed by a 0.170 saliva secretion rate and 0.118 remaining teeth in daily life performance. Conclusions: Activities of daily living and rate of saliva secretion showed the highest correlations to nutritional status of the elderly.
  • 13.

    Relationship between demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the Korean elderly and unmet dental care needs

    jung eun seo | AHN, GEUM-SUN | 2018, 18(6) | pp.911~920 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study investigated the relationship between demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the Korean elderly and their unmet dental care needs, by using the 2015 data from the 6th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods: In total, 1,372 elderly persons aged 65 and over, who responded to the 6th NHANES, were included in the final analysis. Logistic regression analysis was performed in order to identify any relationship between demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and unmet dental care needs. Results: The rate of unmet dental care needs was shown to be less by 0.799 times in the elderly who reside in dong than those who live in eup and myeon (OR: 0.799, 95% CI: 0.679-0.959). Unmet dental care needs were higher in participants with ‘low’ and ‘below average’ than ‘above average’ income, by 1.645 times (OR: 1.645, 95% CI: 1.087-2.366) and 1.172 times (OR: 1.172, 95% CI: 1.108-1.880), respectively. Elderly individuals living alone had a higher rate of unmet dental care needs than those living with their family by 1.157 times (OR: 1.157, 95% CI: 1.084-1.498). Conclusions: Demographic and socioeconomic factors influenced unmet dental care needs, causing inequality. Proper policy support to the vulnerable should be considered in order to enhance the elderly’s access to dental care.
  • 14.

    The number of existing permanent teeth and the denture status of elderly adults aged 65 years and above living in metropolitan cities using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    김지수 | 김세연 | Eun-Joo Jun and 2other persons | 2018, 18(6) | pp.921~932 | number of Cited : 5
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the number of existing permanent teeth and the denture usage status in elderly adults aged 65 years and above living in metropolitan cities and to confirm the degree of oral health inequality caused by the differences in oral conditions in each metropolitan city using the Lorenz curve and the Gini coefficient. Methods: The raw data for the analysis were obtained from the dataset of the sixth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted between 2013 and 2015. The subjects included 1,764 people who underwent oral examination and answered questions. The complex samples general linear model was used to analyze the number of existing permanent teeth adjusted for age and monthly household income. The proportion of edentulousness and the denture status was analyzed using complex samples crosstabs. Results: The number of existing permanent teeth in the elderly adults aged 65 years and above was lowest in Ulsan (15.41) and highest in Gwangju (20.44). The proportion of edentulousness was highest in Busan (14.5%) and lowest in Daejeon (4.0%). With regard to the proportion of denture users, Busan had the highest tendency fordenture usage (50.4%) and Gwangju had the lowest tendency (34.9) (p=0.172). The Gini’s coefficientfor the number of existing teeth was lowest in Busan (0.332). Oral health inequality was most severein metropolitan cities. Conclusions: We found that oral health inequality exists among elderly adultsliving in the metropolitan cities of Korea using the Lorenz curve and Gini’s coefficient.
  • 15.

    Trends by year in the relationship between smoking and oral health in adults

    Song, Ae-Hee | Jung Eun Ju | 2018, 18(6) | pp.933~946 | number of Cited : 4
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study analyzed smoking trends by year in the relationship between smoking and oral health. Methods: This study targeted adults older than 19 years. To investigate the relationship between smoking and oral health status, composite sample Chi-square analysis and composite sample logistic regression analysis were performed using the fifth and sixth Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys. Results: Higher percentages of smokers were males in their 30s, high school graduates, single, with annual drinking habits, and higher stress perception. Analysis of smokers by year showed that smokers' rates decreased in all groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that smoking and sociodemographic factors are relevant to oral health status. The findings may be useful for informing the development of a personalized oral health promotion program for smokers.
  • 16.

    Relationship among oral health perception, oral health practices, and health-promoting lifestyle in soldiers

    Park.j.s | 한예슬 | 2018, 18(6) | pp.947~956 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship among oral health perception, practicality, and the health-promoting lifestyle profile (HPLP) of soldiers, to finalize the oral health education content to be offered to military personnel under military service and explore remedial measures. Methods: The subjects included military soldiers older than 19 years of age in the Chungnam province. The study instrument was a structured questionnaire evaluating the general characteristics, HPLP, oral health perception, and oral health practice. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA, Pearson correlation, and multiple regression analysis. Results: The HPLP evaluation of the soldiers was 3.39, and the group with the higher HPLP level showed better oral health recognition and oral health practice, with a statistically significant difference. There were differences in oral health perception, tooth brushing practice, and oral health education interest depending on the level of education and stratum of the soldier. The higher the soldier's HPLP, the higher were the oral health perception and oral health practice. The factors affecting the HPLP were oral health perception, tooth brushing practice, and interest in oral health education. Conclusions: After the military discharge, it is necessary to devise ways that will enhance oral health perception and practices that promote good oral health and lifestyle.
  • 17.

    Effects of health behaviors on the periodontal health status of Korea young man: The 6th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Han Su Jin | 2018, 18(6) | pp.957~967 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The aim of this study was to confirm health behaviors that affect periodontal health status. Based on these results, we also intended to provide information for the prevention of gingivitis prior to periodontitis and establish strategies for maintaining healthy periodontal tissues. Methods: Data for this descriptive study were extracted from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013–2015. A total of 2,710 adults, aged 19-39 years were included in this study. Complex logistic regression analyses were performed to confirm relationships between health behaviors and periodontal health, after adjusting for socio-demographics, oral and systemic health status. Results: Dental clinic visits (odd ratio [OR] = 1.761, 95% confidence interval [CI]; 1.391-2.229), use of floss (OR = 1.504, 95% CI; 1.213-1.865), and non-smoking (OR = 1.269, 95% CI; 1.040-1.549) were found to support periodontal health. Conclusions: Dental visits for continued professional oral health care, self-oral care including interdental flossing, and a non-smoking habit, are necessary for periodontal health maintenance. Additionally, the results suggest that physical activities such as regular walking can help. These methods should be considered as the primary preventative care strategies for minimizing the occurrence of gingival inflammation.
  • 18.

    Relationship of oral health care with impaired fasting glucosel

    On-Ju Ju | Mi-Sun Yu | 장선희 | 2018, 18(6) | pp.969~977 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of oral health care in the control of diabetes mellitus. Methods: The raw data of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were utilized and 4,445 adults aged 19 and over were surveyed and examined. Complex samples crosstabs and general linear model analysis were carried out. Results: In total, 69.6 percent of the subjects were normal, 21.4 percent had impaired fasting glucose, and 9.0 percent had diabetes. By sex, 25.8 percent of the men had impaired fasting glucose and 10.8 percent had diabetes. Women with impaired fasting glucose accounted for 17.2 percent and 7.2 percent of women had diabetes. Impaired fasting glucose and diabetes were more common among men. Fasting glucose values were higher in the respondents who were male, were younger, whose monthly mean household income was lower, and who were less educated. Fasting glucose values were higher when the frequency of toothbrushing was lower and when dental floss and a dental brush were not in use. Fasting glucose was lower when there was no periodontal disease, when there was less difficulty in mastication, and when there were no implants in the upper and lower jaws. Conclusions: Oral health care workers should develop a variety of programs to motivate patients to take care of their own oral health actively and responsibly.
  • 19.

    Relationship between socioeconomic status and periodontal disease using Structural Equation Modeling

    황수연 | Jin Young Yang | Kim Ki - Eun | 2018, 18(6) | pp.979~986 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between socioeconomic status and periodontal disease. Methods: The data used for the analysis were obtained from the sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2015). A total of 5,632 adults, aged over 19 years, were included in the study. This study analyzed data relating to socioeconomic status and health behaviors. The socioeconomic status was defined as an exogenous factor. Periodontal disease was the endogenous variable. Health behavior was a mediating variable. The study hypotheses were tested using Structural Equation Modeling analysis with Mplus 7.0 software. Results: According to the model fit test, the associated root-mean-square error was 0.05 (90% CI: 0.046-0.059); comparative fit index was 0.93; Tucker-Lewis index was 0.88; and standardized root-mean-square residual was 0.03. We found that socioeconomic status had significant effects on health behaviors (β=0.304, p<0.001) and periodontal disease (β=-0.289, p=0.001). Moreover, health behaviors had significant effects on periodontal diseases (β=0.143, p<0.001). The analysis of a possible relationship between socioeconomic status and periodontal disease using path analysis demonstrated health behaviors difficulties, along with direct and indirect effects, further increased the risk of periodontal disease. Conclusions: The findings suggest that future interventions for the prevention of periodontal disease should consider health behavior.
  • 20.

    Perception of smartphone applications for oral health care education in infants and toddlers

    Kim,Kyung-Hoe | KyeongHee Lee | 2018, 18(6) | pp.987~1001 | number of Cited : 4
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study aimed to provide basic data for future development and promotion of oral health care educational material. We examined the perception of teachers and parents on the use of smartphone applications as educational materials and the factors affecting the intent to use such materials in infants and toddlers. Methods: Teachers and parents of children enrolled in educational institutions in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province, Korea, participated in this study for a one-month period starting from August 2018. Results: The intent to use a freely available smartphone application for oral health education in infants and toddlers was high for both parents and teachers at 81.7% and 78.4%, respectively. The intent to use increased 10.089-fold when a child had unrestricted access to mobile devices, and 4.435-fold when the execution path required modification; however, the ease of use was not compromised. Additionally, the intent to use also increased 2.488-fold when a child had used an educational oral healthcare material that is currently available, and by 2.431-fold and 2.219-fold when a child had previous experiences with an educational mobile application developed for infants and toddlers. Conclusions: Our findings showed that the teachers and parents had a positive perception towards the use of mobile applications for oral health care education in infants and toddlers. We recommend the development and promotion of mobile-based educational applications on oral health care, which are tailored to the needs and oral characteristics of infants and toddlers to help develop good oral care habits.