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pISSN : 2287-1705 / eISSN : 2288-2294

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2019, Vol.19, No.1

  • 1.

    A literature review on measurement tools for dental hygienist turnover intention in Korea

    Soo-Auk Park | Ju-Yul Lee | 2019, 19(1) | pp.1~17 | number of Cited : 7
    Abstract PDF
    This study investigates the overall research trends and related factors affecting the turnover of dental hygienists in Korea during the past 10 years (2007-2017) and analyzed the differences in the results of the research according to the main measurement tools. The literature review focused on turnover of dental hygienists in Korea. Inclusion criteria of selected studies were as follows: the domestic and foreign academic journals and theses published for the past 10 years (between 2007-2017). The most commonly used tool for measuring dental hygienist turnover was a tool developed by Lawler. The most used significant general characteristics is age and income, Job satisfaction (57.1%) and organizational commitment (40.0%) were the most frequently used predictors of turnover. The variables used for each turnover measurement tool were different, showing that the study results was different from according to the variables and significance level. Although there have been many studies related to the turnover of dental hygienists, different results have been shown depending on the measurement tools. When conducting research related to dental hygienist turnover, specific and clear presentation of measurement tool selection or development is needed.
  • 2.

    Current conditions of dental hygiene clinical training in Korea and suggestions for improvement

    Won Bok-Yun | Jang Gye Won | Mi-Yeong Hwang and 4other persons | 2019, 19(1) | pp.19~31 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The aim of this study was to propose a standardized guideline for clinical training courses among dental hygiene departments of colleges in Korea. This study comparatively evaluated periods and durations of the curricula and specific domains, credits and hours of clinical training classes, and institutions providing practical lessons, and calculated the total credits and hours. Methods: From August 15 to September 15, 2017, a literature review was conducted in dental hygiene departments of 82 schools around the country in order to investigate the current conditions of clinical training in each educational system. Furthermore, 5 colleges were selected from each type of educational system, and their credits and hours for clinical training were analyzed in subjects of practical training for clinical dental hygiene, practical training for dental clinic, practical training for local community dental health, clinical training, and pre-clinical level practical training. The total credits and hours were calculated on the basis of analysis results. Results: The findings revealed that the hours of clinical training classes and hours per credit for practical training in the dental hygiene departments as well as the practical training institutions varied between the colleges. In some cases, the hours of practical training were not indicated. Standardized clinical training in the dental hygiene department was allotted 675 hours, whereas practical training in local community dental health studies was allotted 105 hours, which totaled to 780 allotted hours. Conclusions: There was a significant difference among the colleges in terms of the current conditions of clinical training in the dental hygiene department. The literature review revealed that a total of 780 hours was allotted to clinical training, and this was significantly more than the standard (500 hours) set by the . Moreover, these clinical training hours were lower than in advanced countries or other health and medical treatment occupations. Therefore, efficient improvement is required in order to provide a timely guideline for clinical training.
  • 3.

    Analysis of dental hygienists’ perception of knowledge and attitude toward digital oral scanner

    Lee Cheon Hee | AHN SUN HA | 2019, 19(1) | pp.33~44 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: To investigate how dental hygienists who have never used a digital oral scanner perceive the impression acquisition and evidence needed for prosthesis planning by using a digital oral scanner. Methods: From July 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017, subjects from Daegu, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea, were selected. The purpose of the study was described to dental hygienists who had never used a digital intraoral scanner. Questionnaires were distributed to the students selected. Of the 137 questionnaires distributed, 93 were used in the analysis after excluding 44 completed questionnaires that had errors or missing answers. Results: Of the respondents, 33.7% (36/93) were aged ≥30 years, 68.8% graduated from a 3-year vocational college course, 33.5% were aged ≥33 years, and 61.3%. At present, our center has the largest number of clinics (92.5%). The difficulty of impression taking using the digital oral scanner significantly differed ( p <0.05) according to age and current occupation ( p <0.05). Impression taking using a digital oral scanner significantly affected the present workflow of dental hygienists and their interest in sharing information about future use of digital oral scanner ( p <0.01). Conclusions: If more routes are available to access digital intraoral scanners and more systems are developed for clinical use, the digital intraoral scanner could become digitized in the dental system; thereby, the existing impressions could be replaced with digitized impressions. With digital intraoral scanners, the expansion of the business of dental hygiene can be expected.
  • 4.

    Factors influencing job embeddedness in dental hygienists

    Kyoung-Hye Min | Min Hee-Hong | 2019, 19(1) | pp.45~54 | number of Cited : 4
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine factors influencing job embeddedness in dental clinic hygienists. Through this study, we suggest the necessity to increase job embeddedness and use that as basic data for effective dental personnel management. Methods: A self-reported questionnaire was filled out by 219 dental clinic hygienists from September 8 to October 8, 2018. Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0. Independent t-test, oneway ANOVA, Scheffe’s post-hoc test, and Pearson correlation coefficient were reviewed, and a multiple regression analysis was conducted. Results: Dental hygienists scored 3.14 points in job embeddedness. The variables that influenced clinical job embeddedness were self-efficacy, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction. These factors had 56.7% of variance in dental clinic hygienists. Conclusions: Job satisfaction was the most affected factor for dental clinic hygienists. In order to maintain effective personnel management of dental hygienists, strategic program development and application are needed to improve job embeddedness.
  • 5.

    Factors analysis of the oral health-related quality of life in the elderly

    조은덕 | 김은솔 | Hong Hae-Kyung and 1other persons | 2019, 19(1) | pp.55~64 | number of Cited : 6
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in oral health-related quality of life among elderly people aged over 65 years, in terms of physical, mental and oral health status and to analyze factors affecting their oral health-related quality of life. Methods: From May 9 to June 23, 2017, we randomly visited aged-care community centers in the metropolitan area, and recruited 222 elderly, aged 65 or older. First, each participant completed a questionnaire consisting of 4 general items: 1 systematic disease, and 3 subjective oral conditions. Afterwards, the researchers interviewed the participants to assess their mental status, using MMSE-DS and recorded the responses. Finally, an oral examination was performed to determine the number of remaining teeth. The average oral health-related quality of life according to each characteristic was analyzed by t-test and ANOVA. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis were used to analyze the correlations between factors and the factors affecting oral health-related quality of life. Results: The mean oral health-related quality of life was 4.15. Participants with 20 or more remaining teeth demonstrated better oral health-related quality of life than those with 19 or less teeth. Higher oral health-related quality of life was also found among elderly without gingival bleeding, self-reported halitosis and dry mouth. In addition, positive correlation with the number of remaining teeth and negative correlation with gingival bleeding, self-reported halitosis and dry mouth, were noted. Finally, the results of the hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that remaining teeth, gingival bleeding, self-reported halitosis and education were influential factors in determining the oral health-related quality of life among the elderly. Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the necessity of better policy support, and the importance of implementing delivered, elderly-centered oral health education program by professionals to prevent tooth loss and manage periodontal diseases.
  • 6.

    Effect of cognitive function and oral health status on mastication ability in elderly individuals

    ChoiMaI | HieJin Noh | Sun-Young Han and 1other persons | 2019, 19(1) | pp.65~78 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study was conducted to characterize the impact of cognitive function and oral health status on mastication in senior citizens, ≥65 years of age, using senior centers in the city of Wonju, South Korea. Methods: A cross-sectional study consisting of a simple oral examination and survey questionnaires was performed in 154 individuals. General characteristics, subjective masticatory function, objective masticatory function, cognitive function, and oral health status were collected as variables. Correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. A p -value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The subjective masticatory function was scored using the 5-point Likert scale. When subjective masticatory function was analyzed in groups according to cognitive function, the mean subjective masticatory function scores were 4.31, 4.09, and 3.29 in the normal group (cognitive score of ≥16), suspected dementia group (cognitive score of 1215), and mild dementia group (cognitive score of ≤11), respectively. Thus, subjective masticatory function decreased along with decreasing cognitive function. When cognitive function, subjective masticatory function, and objective masticatory function were compared with indicators of oral health status (number of functional teeth, oral dryness), subjective masticatory function exhibited a significant positive correlation with objective masticatory function (r=0.635, p <0.01), cognitive function (r=0.292, p <0.01), and total number of functional teeth, including prosthetic appliances (dentures) (r=0.305, p <0.01). According to the regression analysis, age, sex, number of functional teeth, and cognitive function affected subjective masticatory function. Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that age, sex, number of functional teeth, and cognitive function affected subjective masticatory function, whereas oral dryness did not. Therefore, dental professionals must consider subjective masticatory function when providing oral care in senior patients with low cognitive function.
  • 7.

    Oral care status and elderly oral health knowledge of care workers and caregivers with regard to patients with dementia

    KyeongHee Lee | Yoon Young Choi | jung eun seo | 2019, 19(1) | pp.79~91 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to contribute to the development of an oral hygiene care program for patients with dementia by understanding the oral care status and oral health knowledge of care workers and caregivers with regard to patients with dementia. Methods: For about two months from May to June 2018, a survey of care workers and caregivers working in long-term nursing homes and elderly-specialized nursing hospitals was performed, and 442 people were selected for the final analysis. The frequency and percentage were calculated to understand the oral care status and oral health knowledge regarding patients with dementia, and an independent t-test was conducted to determine the difference between the elderly oral health knowledge of care workers and caregivers. Multiple regression analysis was also carried out to examine factors affecting elderly oral health knowledge. Results: With respect to the factor of oral health education in elderly oral health knowledge, oral health knowledge was shown to be highest when participants responded that education was unnecessary ( p <0.001), and regarding the will to participate in oral health education, oral health knowledge was highest when participants responded as having no desire to participate ( p <0.05). Conclusions: These results suggest that a standard manual should be developed for the accurate and qualitative management of oral hygiene care tasks performed by care workers and caregivers who are in charge of oral care for patients with dementia in order to provide continuous and systematic oral care.
  • 8.

    The relationship of oral health behavior with oral health literacy and oral health knowledge among elementary school students

    장선주 | Yoon Sung Uk | 2019, 19(1) | pp.93~103 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study aimed to analyze the oral health behavior in the upper grades of elementary school in relation to oral health literacy and oral health knowledge. Methods: A survey on the general characteristics, oral health literacy, oral health knowledge, and oral health behavior was administered to students in the upper grades of five elementary schools in Daegu and Gyeongbuk, South Korea, from March to June, 2018. Finally, a total of 236 questionnaires were analyzed. Results: Oral health literacy in accordance with oral health behavior was high when oral health behavior was high ( p <0.05). The results of multiple regression analysis of the general characteristics, oral health knowledge, oral health literacy, and oral health behavior were analyzed as follows: Y (oral health behavior) = 2.028 + 0.113 (oral health literacy) ( p <0.05). Conclusions: To ensure appropriate oral health behavior among elementary school students, it is necessary to develop systematic programs in elementary schools to provide oral health education to increase oral health literacy and oral health knowledge.
  • 9.

    Effects of social support on toothbrushing in children and adolescents

    곽선희 | A-Yeon Jeong | Soo-Myoung Bae and 2other persons | 2019, 19(1) | pp.105~116 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study aimed to confirm the relationship between toothbrushing practice after lunch and typical oral health behaviors in children and adolescents according to the subject and type of social support. Methods: The study used data from the 2010 Korean Survey on the Health of Youth and Children and selected 8,704 elementary, middle, and high school students as final targets. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to confirm the link between social support and toothbrushing after lunch. Results: The results showed that in elementary and vocational high school students, statistical significance of all social support variables disappeared after controlling for both demographic and social factors and oral symptom experience. However, in the middle school students, the emotional support of the neighbors and the emotional support of the teachers showed statistically significant effect on brushing daily after lunch ( p <0.05). In general high school students, there was a significant association between family emotional support and toothbrushing after lunch ( p <0.01). Conclusions: The oral health promotion program for children and adolescents needs to be integrated and coordinated with the overall health promotion program. In particular, it is believed that the school-based program can strengthen the practice of health behaviors by inducing behavioral changes based on the formation of healthy relationships and trust of colleagues and teachers. Therefore, it is necessary to develop social network-based programs including social support such as emotional health and healthy relationships that can be applied among children for oral health promotion.
  • 10.

    Factors influencing unmet dental needs of preschool children: A study based on data of the 2013-2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHNES)

    YEO AN NA | Yu-Min Kang | Lee, Su Young | 2019, 19(1) | pp.117~129 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of demographic characteristics and oral health status on unmet dental needs among preschool children and to provide a basis for improvement of the dental care equality and accessibility using data from the 6th National Health and Nutrition Survey. Methods: This study was performed using data collected from the 6th National Health and Nutrition Survey. The subjects were 1,472 out of 22,940 people, who participated in the survey and under went oral examination. IBM SPSS Statistics (Version 20.0) was used for statistical analyses based on the complex sampling design. Frequency analysis was performed to determine the distribution of unmet dental needs according to the characteristics of the subjects. The Rao-Scott χ2 test was performed to examine the relationship of unmet dental needs with general characteristics and health- and oral health-related variables. Relevant factors were determined using binary logistic regression analysis. Results: The factors that had statistically significant relations with unmet dental needs included age, medical insurance, household income, limited physical activity, history of dental caries in deciduous teeth, and subjective health status. Logistic regression analysis of complex samples was conducted to determine factors related to unmet dental needs. The results of analysis showed that limited physical activity and history of dental caries in deciduous teeth were related to unmet dental needs. Conclusions: The results show the factors affecting, and the reasons for, the unmet dental needs of preschool children. Future studies are needed to develop national projects and oral health education reforms to address inequalities in preschool children's dental care.
  • 11.

    Relationship between asthma and dental caries in Korean adults: Data from the Sixth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Yoon Young Choi | 2019, 19(1) | pp.131~140 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between asthma and dental caries by using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), from 2013 to 2015. Methods: The study included 11,731 subjects who were ≥19 years of age and analyzed their demographic-, socioeconomic-, health-, and oral health carerelated data. The chi-squared test and logistic regression analysis were conducted using complex sample analyses to examine the relationship between asthma and dental caries. Results: Compared with the control group, the risk for dental caries in the asthma group was 1.207 times higher, regardless of various confounding factors ( p <0.001). In the asthma group, the mean DMFT score was significantly higher than that in the control group ( p <0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, the mean number of DMFT in subjects with asthma was 7.67, which was higher than that in subjects without asthma (7.28) ( p <0.001). Conclusions: The study results show that asthma may be a risk factor for dental caries. Therefore, in order to prevent dental caries in asthma patients, oral hygiene education is important.
  • 12.

    Survey of the real-world re-use of disposable dental supplies in dental offices

    Park Bo Young | So Jung Mun | WON GYUN CHUNG and 2other persons | 2019, 19(1) | pp.141~149 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: To investigate the real-world re-use of disposable dental supplies (DDS) in dental offices and assess the relationship between general characteristics of dental hygienists and reuse of DDS, with respect to infection control characteristics. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to 277 dental hygienists to assess their general characteristics, awareness of infection control/DDS management, and re-use of DDS. Nine DDS were categorized into the following categories based on their purpose: Critical, Semicritical, Noncritical, and Personal protective equipment (PPE). The association between general characteristics of dental hygienists and re-use of DDS, with respect to infection control characteristics, was assessed using the chi-squared test. Results: All 9 DDS were re-used to different extents. The highest reuse rate of supplies were for masks (64.6%), prophylaxis cups (61.0%) and plastic saliva ejectors (30.0%). Overall, 89.5% of the participants re-used DDS; subgroup analysis showed the following proportions of specific DDS re-use: PPE 66.4%; Semicritical DDS 63.9%; Noncritical DDS 19.5%; and Critical DDS 1.8%. Based on the type of clinic, the rate of re-use was higher in dental clinics than dental hospitals. Thus, the re-use of DDS may be caused by inappropriate or nonexistent guidelines or habitual practice, rather than the awareness or attitude of dental hygienists. Conclusions: In order to ensure a safe environment within the dental clinic, DDS classifications must be clearly outlined in the dental infection control guidelines; moreover, additional studies are needed regarding the regulations for DDS re-use and disposal.
  • 13.

    Rinsing time and enamel surface changes after fluoride application

    조민정 | Daun Kim | 2019, 19(1) | pp.151~159 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relation between rinsing time and the change in enamel surface after fluoride application on the enamel surface. Methods: We recruited two sample groups with different mouth rinsing times. While one group rinsed the teeth immediately after applying acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel, the other group rinsed the teeth 30 minutes after APF gel application. In each group, we performed the following four-step experiment: (i) apply APF gel on the teeth, (ii) rinse the teeth, (iii) immerse the teeth in orange juice, and (iv) measure enamel surface microhardness and scan enamel surfaces. Results: The group that rinsed 30 minutes after treatment exhibited greater microhardness than the group that rinsed immediately after fluoride treatment. The former also showed smooth and regular crystallization, whereas the latter showed rough and damaged crystallization and irregular surfaces. Conclusions: Based on these observations, we conclude that delaying the rinsing time improves the dental caries preventive effect of fluoride.