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pISSN : 2287-1705 / eISSN : 2288-2294

2020 KCI Impact Factor : 1.08
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2020, Vol.20, No.2

  • 1.

    Analysis of the oral health unit of elementary school health textbooks

    Park Jung-Eun | Su-Yeon Hwang | 장종화 | 2020, 20(2) | pp.119~128 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study aimed to analyze the textbook content, specifically that of the oral health units, of Korean elementary health textbooks in order to discuss oral health education in elementary schools through textbooks. Methods: The study analyzed the “oral health” units of six health textbooks for students in the fifth and sixth grades of elementary school in Korea. It identified the number of pictures, practice contents, and summaries in the textbooks, calculating the proportion of oral health units relative to the total number of pages in the textbook and comparing the learning goals provided by the WHO with the education contents. In addition, the study also analyzed several keywords from the textbooks in terms of whether they relate to oral health. Results: The comprehensive analysis on the oral health units within the three health textbooks analyzed revealed that all three were similar, except that the textbook from publisher A did not include an introduction. The three textbooks also had differences in terms of the organization of the contents. In terms of the learning goals of the oral health units, there were differences between the WHO standards and the learning goals from the textbooks, with the WHO standards only partially reflected. The analysis also showed that there were more keywords on oral diseases than those related to oral health management and prevention. Conclusions: Improvements should be made regarding the learning goals and education topics of health education in order to ensure that children receive a more systematic oral health education in their earlier years, which will help to develop and correct oral health management habits among elementary school students.
  • 2.

    Analysis of dental utilization and expenditure of patients with chronic diseases

    Kim Yun Jeong | 2020, 20(2) | pp.129~137 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: Using the annual data from the 2016 Korean Health Panel, this study aims to identify the factors that affect the dental utilization and expenditure of patients with chronic diseases, and to provide basic data to explain the inequality gap in dental utilization. Methods: The dental utilization and expenditure of 3,557 patients with chronic diseases were analyzedfor frequency using the SPSS Windows version 23.0 (SPSS Inc. IL, USA). Analysis of the factors that affect dental utilization and expenditure were performed using a multiple regression analysis. The level of statistical significance was 0.05. Results: The frequency of dental utilization in patients with chronic diseases was high for subjects who were younger than 65 years and those whose education level was below high school. The frequency of dental utilization was relatively lower for subjects who did not have disabilities and those with healthier subjective health status. The dental expenditure of patients with chronic diseases was higher in subjects who were younger than 65 years and those with greater household income. Conclusions: The above findings suggest that a plan is needed to control dental utilization by efficiently managing chronic diseases, and that a policy-based plan is needed to devise ways to supplement the uninsured medical expenses of dental care.
  • 3.

    A study on the validation of learning goals of community dental hygiene practicum based on the community dental hygiene process of care

    Sang-Hee Yoo | Soo-Myoung Bae | Bo-Mi, Shin and 1other persons | 2020, 20(2) | pp.139~153 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to define the concept of the community dental hygiene process of care and to develop competency-based learning goals applying the community dental hygiene process of care. Methods: Based on 12 references, the concept of community dental hygiene process of care was defined, and 393 learning objectives were derived to carry out the first and second categorization process. The 57 learning goals were classified according to the 15-week learning subject (once a week) for project learning. To evaluate the validity of the developed learning subjects and goals, 80 community dental hygiene professors were surveyed. The final learning subjects and goals were created by going through the process of collecting opinions from the 35 validity evaluation results received as responses, and opinions from 10 community dental hygiene professors. Results: The first and second validity surveys on the operational definition of community dental hygiene process of care showed 4.32 points and 4.60 points, respectively. As a result of the evaluation of the validity of the learning subjects and goals for 1~15 weeks, the average validity of the learning subjects was 4.44 points, and of learning goals was 4.32 points. Conclusions: The learning subjects and goals developed by applying the theoretical framework for community dental hygiene process of care defined in this study can be used as a learning guideline for learners to understand the theory of community dental hygiene area and to derive the standards of competence in the field of practice.
  • 4.

    A case study on the development and application of flipped learning based clinical dental hygiene curriculum

    Su-Ra Jeong | Mi-Sun Kim | EUN JEONG KIM and 1other persons | 2020, 20(2) | pp.155~166 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to prove, through the design and operation of a teaching learning model for clinical dental hygiene and practice III, the effectiveness of the flipped learning PARTNER model. Methods: A professional council was formed, composed of three professors of dental hygiene and one professor of education; each member was an expert with a Ph.D. From December 2018 to February 2019. Results: Learning preferences for the clinical learning hygiene curriculum based on flip learning showed that it had higher accessibility than traditional teaching methods. Subjects’ motivation to learn was improved through flip learning, their critical thinking ability was improved through active discussion and flip team discussion, and their self-directed learning ability was also improved. Participation increased through flipped learning, and subjects’ skill abilities showed their highest score by improving their performance through the whole lecture. A high satisfaction of 4.54 out of 5 points was achieved. Conclusions: It was confirmed that the development and operation of a flipped learning-based clinical hygiene curriculum can provide an effective and satisfactory learning process.
  • 5.

    Emotional intelligence and self-efficacy on innovative behavior of clinical dental hygienists

    Mi-Hyun Choi | Min Hee-Hong | 2020, 20(2) | pp.167~174 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify causal factors for continuous innovative behavior and devise a plan for effective member management by improving continuous innovative behavior. Methods: A self-reported questionnaire was filled out by 190 clinical dental hygienists from June 1 to July 31, 2019. Data were analyzed using SPSS 22.0. The independent t-test, one-way analysis of variance, Scheffe's post-hoc test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis were performed, and a stepwise multiple regression analysis was conducted. Results: Dental hygienists scored 3.43 points in innovative behavior. Variables influencing innovative behavior were emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, and educational level. These factors had a variance of 47.5% among clinical dental hygienists. Conclusions: It is necessary to develop a regular program aimed at improving the emotional intelligence and self-efficacy of clinical dental hygienists to exert a positive work effect and improve their innovative behavior rather than assigning them simple tasks.
  • 6.

    Opinions of Korean dental hygienists on the advanced dental hygienist system in Korea

    김창희 | Sun-Mi Lee | 김형미 | 2020, 20(2) | pp.175~187 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the opinions of Korean dental hygienists on the Korean advanced dental hygienist system in Korea. Methods: The survey was conducted on 328 dental hygienists working at dental clinics and hospitals in Seoul, Gyeonggi-do, Incheon, and Chungcheong-do. Collected data were analyzed with the frequency analysis, independent-samples t-test, and one-way analysis of variance after their reliability and validity were verified through the reliability, exploratory factor, and confirmatory factor analyses. Results: Respondents preferred sectoral advanced dental hygienists to integrated advanced dental hygienists, but 47.0% of respondents did not respond to this questionnaire item. To become an advanced dental hygienist, ‘more than 5 years but less than 8 years’ of clinical experience was appropriate according to 45.7% of the respondents and ‘more than 30 h but less than 40 h’ of training period was appropriate according to 25.9% of the respondents. Respondents thought that the duration of the training period for advanced dental hygienists would be directly proportional to expectations from the effect of advanced dental hygienists (p=0.023). Further, respondents who were usually interested in advanced dental hygienists showed higher expectations from the role (p<0.001) and effect (p<0.001) of advanced dental hygienists than those who were not interested. Conclusions: This study suggests various implications of the introduction of the advanced dental hygienist system in Korea.
  • 7.

    Factors influencing the customer orientation of clinical dental hygienists

    Yu-Jeong Do | Min Hee-Hong | 2020, 20(2) | pp.189~196 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: This study aims to investigate the impact of clinical dental hygienists on customer orientation and prepare basic data for the rational and efficient human resource management of dental hygienists. Methods: A self-reported questionnaire was completed by 220 dental hygienists from July 7 to August 8, 2019. Data were analyzed using the IBM SPSS Statistics 22.0 program with a significance level of 0.05. Results: The customer orientation of clinical dental hygienists was 4.09, internal marketing was 3.10, organizational citizenship behavior was 3.97, and self-efficacy was 3.91. The variables that most influenced their turnover intention were those related to organizational citizenship behavior. These factors showed a 28.8% variance among dental hygienists. Conclusions: This study recommends the development and application of a program that enhances dental hygienists’ customer orientation, recognizes them as internal clients, and improves dental productivity.
  • 8.

    Factors affecting the professional image of dental hygienists

    Hye-Jung Choi | Kyung-Hwa Park | 2020, 20(2) | pp.197~207 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: To provide basic information for improving the professional image of the dental hygienist among adults who visit the dentist. Methods: From December 5, 2018 to January 25, 2019, 214 adults in Seoul or Gyeonggi filled out a Google online questionnaire. Data were analyzed using t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and multiple regression analysis. Results: The overall average score of the professional image of dental hygienists was 3.59. In addition, there were significant differences in the image according to age, education, and occupation. The image according to the dental visit experience was highest for those providing orthodontic treatment. The difference in professional image recognized by the dental hygienists and the patients was highest in the case of those dental hygienists responding that they had been educated at a four-year university, who were considered as medical practitioners, and were called a dental hygienist. Lastly, the factors related to the professional image of the dental hygienist were positively affected in the case of preventive purpose of visit, and graduate or higher education of the patients. Conclusions: In order to establish the professional image of dental hygienists, public relations for adequate occupational awareness of their work should be continued. Additionally, it is necessary to establish the role through the systematic expansion of the professional image and their being considered as medical professionals, reflecting the reality of the work field.
  • 9.

    A study on the work life of dental hygienists : for dental hygienists and dental hygiene students

    Heo Nam Suk | leeyuhee | 2020, 20(2) | pp.209~220 | number of Cited : 3
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: Although dental hygienists have a high employment rate as professional workers, turnover and retirement rates are very high. This study analyzed the factors related to work life of dental hygienists to prepare an alternative for life extension. Methods: From August 1 to December 31, 2019, 224 dental hygienists and 446 dental hygiene students were examined. Results: The expected working years for dental hygienists were 10–14 years (25.4%) and over 31 years (22.4%) for dental hygiene students. The recognized working years for dental hygienists were 10–14 years (22.4%) and 20–24 years (26.0%) for dental hygiene students. Work values of dental hygienists and dental hygiene students averaged 3.85 and 3.86, respectively. Furthermore, the average motive for selecting a major in dental hygienists was 3.08 points and in dental hygiene students, 3.24 points. The average career identity of dental hygienists and dental hygiene students were 2.82 and 2.91 points, respectively. Conclusions: The perception difference between dental hygienists and dental hygiene students was compared, and the factors that could play a positive role in prolonging life were identified. Based on this study, further systematic comparative studies and preparation of alternatives for life extension are required.
  • 10.

    Relationship among meta-cognition, learning strategy, and self-directedness of dental hygiene students

    LEE CHUN SUN | Sun-Mi Lee | 김창희 | 2020, 20(2) | pp.221~232 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The aim of this study was to suggest a method for training students majoring in dental hygiene with a sense of professionalism by identifying meta-cognition, efficient learning strategies, and self-directedness necessary to become a spontaneous, self-controlled learner. Methods: A survey was conducted on 316 students majoring in dental hygiene, and collected data were analyzed using SPSS, version 23.0. A post-hoc analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, t-test, analysis of variance, and Duncan's multiple range test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationship among meta-cognition, learning strategy, and self-directedness. Results: The meta-cognition, learning strategy, and self-directedness scores of students majoring in dental hygiene were 3.25, 3.08, and 3.12, respectively. Meta-cognition was significant because the grade was lower, and the previous semester grade and major satisfaction were higher. Learning strategy was significant because the previous semester grade and major satisfaction were higher among general high school students. Self-directedness was significantly low in students whose self-conviction score was below 2.0 in terms of the previous semester grade and significantly high with high self-satisfaction. Conclusions: Instructors at the dental hygiene department should acknowledge the importance of meta-cognition, find various teaching methods to improve learning strategy, and encourage students to participate in class by enhancing self-directedness in learning.
  • 11.

    The effect of medical service satisfaction of orthodontic treatment on life quality related to oral health(OHIP-14)

    Kyung Ja Ryu | Hwang joohee | 2020, 20(2) | pp.233~242 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between perceived oral health, medical service satisfaction, and oral health impact profile (OHIP-14) and the factors affecting OHIP for orthodontic patients, and to provide basic data to improve the quality of life of orthodontic patients in accordance with oral health. Methods: The study explained the purpose and purport of this study to orthodontic patients who visit dental clinics located in Daejeon and Chungcheong province for about two months from July 01, 2019, and conducted a self‐reported questionnaire survey for 220 participants who agreed to participate in this study. of the collected questionnaires, data of 197 subjects were used for the final analysis except 23 that were inadequate. Results: As for orthodontic treatment satisfaction according to perceived oral health and OHIP, there was statistically significant difference between respondents who were ‘very healthy’ and ‘not healthy’ (p<0.05). The higher the supplementary service satisfaction, the higher the orthodontic treatment satisfaction, and the higher the perceived oral health, the OHIP was found to be the higher. The factors affecting OHIP were found to be significantly associated with orthodontic treatment satisfaction and perceived oral health. The explanatory power was 15.6%. Conclusions: Active and ongoing oral health education should be provided to dental hygienists to ensure that the patient's oral cavity is healthy, and although additional services need to be improved, it is more important to have management strategies for patients to improve orthodontic treatment satisfaction.