Korean | English

pISSN : 1975-311X / eISSN : 2287-7215

2020 KCI Impact Factor : 0.54
Home > Explore Content > All Issues > Article List

2015, Vol.10, No.3

  • 1.

    The Effects of Exercise Intensity and Initial Timing on Functional Recovery after Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats

    Junyan Cai | 나상수 | KAK HWANGBO | 2015, 10(3) | pp.219~225 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise intensity and initial timing on functional recovery following sciatic nerve injury in rats. METHODS: Total of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats was used and randomly divided 6 groups. Under deep anesthesia, the sciatic nerve was nipped by adapted hemostatic tweezers for 30 seconds and the injured nerve was transparent under naked eyes. Acute exercise groups was applied treadmill after sciatic nerve crush injury during 5days with three type intensity. Late exercise groups was also applied treadmill during 5 days with three type intensity after 5 days break. Values of sciatic functional index were measured and analyzed in each group after exercise period. RESULTS: The sciatic functional index values between control groups 1, acute low-intensity group, acute middleintensity group in acute phase showed statistical significant (p<.05). The sciatic functional index values between control groups 2, late low-intensity group, late middle-intensity group and late high-intensity in late phase showed statistical significant (p<.05). The comparison in acute and late phase, sciatic functional index values of each low-intensity group and each high-intensity group showed statistical significant (p<.05). CONCLUSION: Whether at acute or late phase, treadmill exercise as a therapy obtained beneficial effects of functional recovery and exercise training at low speed is more beneficial effects on the recovery of motor function in acute phase.
  • 2.

    The Analysis of severity of forward head posture with observation and photographic method

    Lee, Han-Suk | Hyung-kuk Chung | Sun-Wook Park | 2015, 10(3) | pp.227~235 | number of Cited : 4
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: This paper aims to present the available angle to evaluate the severity of forward head posture (FHP) with the observation method and photographic method. METHODS: A cross-sectional observation research design study consisted of 29 subjects who was divided two groups (slight FHP group, moderate FHP group) in Eulji university was used. We evaluated the FHP and the angles including CranioVertebral Angle (CVA), Head Tilting Angle (HTA), Head Position Angle (HPA) and Forward Shoulder Angle (FSA) with the Body style S-8.0 (South Korea, LU Commerce). RESULTS: The mean of CVA, FSA from the slight FHP group was shown higher than moderate severe FHP group. According to independent t-test result, but there was no difference among all angles in two groups. The linear discriminate analysis showed the size of distinction of FSA was the biggest, and then CVA, HTA and HPA were in the order. 55.6% of FSA is properly classified in the slight FHP group. CONCLUSION: The FSA is the best to distinguish the severity of FHP and then CVA as the second best. Therefore, FSA is recommended to check the FHP.
  • 3.

    Effects of Pressure Sense Perception Training on Unstable Surface on Somatosensory, Balance and Gait Function in Patients with Stroke

    김보슬 | 방대혁 | Shin Won Seob | 2015, 10(3) | pp.237~245 | number of Cited : 8
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the effects of pressure sense perception training (PSPT) on various surfaces on the somatosensory system, balance, and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. METHODS: Thirty patients with stroke participated in this study and were randomly assigned to one of three groups; group 1 received the general physical therapy and the PSPT on a stable surface, group 2 received the general physical therapy and the PSPT on an unstable surface, and group 3 received the general physical therapy alone. Participants in group 1 and group 2 underwent 30 min/session, 3 days per week, for 4 weeks. Pressure error (PE) was used to evaluate changes of proprioception. The Balancia, Functional reach test (FRT), and Timed Up and Go (TUG) were used to assess the balance ability, and the 10m Walking Test (10-MWT) was used to assess walking ability. RESULTS: Experimental groups (group 1 and group 2) showed significant differences in PE, FRT, TUG, and 10-MWT compared to the control group (p <0.05). Group 2 (PSPT on an unstable surface) was significantly different in PE, FRT, and 10-MWT from group 1 (p <0.05). No significant differences were observed for other measures. CONCLUSION: Pressure sense perception training on an unstable surface might be a significantly more effective method for improving somatosensory function, balance, and walking ability, than PSPT on a stable surface.
  • 4.

    Severity of Musculoskeletal Pain and Its Effect on Psychosocial Factors in Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    권춘숙 | Suhnyeop Kim | 2015, 10(3) | pp.247~255 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between psychosocial factors and the severity of musculoskeletal pain in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). METHODS: A total of 60 subjects were recruited from among the veterans with musculoskeletal pain at D Veterans Hospital. PTSD was evaluated by using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition; severity of pain was measured by using the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ); depression and anxiety were measured by using the Symptom Checklist- 90-Revision; and the quality of sleep was measured by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. All data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software for Windows. RESULTS: The averages cores of pain intensity (7.48± 1.67), SF-MPQ-sensory (13.84±7.52), SF-MPQ-affective (4.41±3.79), depression (19.30±11.37), anxiety (13.39±7.99), and quality of sleep (10.05±5.89) were obtained in veterans with PTSD. SF-MPQ-sensory measures sleep quality (r=0.346, p<0.01), SF-MPQ-affective measures depression (r=0.318, p<0.01) and anxiety (r=0.404, p<0.01), and these showed a statistically significant positive correlation in veterans with PTSD. Pain levels were observed to be higher in veterans with PTSD. Moreover, in these subjects, physical pain had a significant influence on the anxiety variable among the psychosocial factors. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that musculoskeletal pain provides meaningful information about depression, anxiety, and sleep disorder in veterans with PTSD. Our data suggest that musculoskeletal pain may need to be addressed as part of the health management process of veterans.
  • 5.

    Effect of Weight Shift Training with Electrical Sensory Stimulation Feedback on Standing Balance in Stroke patients

    김다영 | Yong-Jun Cha | 2015, 10(3) | pp.257~263 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of weight shift training with electrical sensory simulation feedback on quiet standing balance in hemiplegic stroke patients. METHODS: 30 stroke patients were equally allocated at random to an experimental group or a control group. Patients in both two groups underwent comprehensive rehabilitation physical therapy for 30 minutes per day for 5 days per week for 4 weeks. Members of the experimental group received additional weight shift training with electrical sensory simulation feedback was conducted for 15 minutes after 30 minute sessions, whereas members of the control group underwent additional leftward/rightward weight shift training by themselves after 30 minutes per day for four weeks. COP (center of pressure) path lengths, COP velocities, and foot forces were measured before and immediately after the 4-week training period in both groups and results were compared. RESULTS: COP path lengths significantly decreased by 3% after training in the experimental group and this was significantly greater than that observed in the control group (p<0.05). In both groups, foot forces of affected sides showed significant increases after intervention, whereas foot forces of unaffected sides showed significant decreases (p<0.05). No significant difference was observed between the two groups with respect to these changes. CONCLUSION: Weight shift training using electrical sensory simulation feedback has a positive effect on quiet standing balance in hemiplegic stroke.
  • 6.

    The Korean language version of Stroke Impact Scale 3.0: Cross-cultural adaptation and translation

    Haejung Lee | Song Ju-min | 2015, 10(3) | pp.265~273 | number of Cited : 7
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: Stoke is one of most common disabling conditions and it is still lacking of measuring patient’s functioning level. The aim of the study was to develop Korean language version of stroke impact scale 3.0. METHODS: Korean version of stroke impact scale 3.0 was developed in idiomatic modern Korean with a standard protocol of multiple forward and backward translations and an expert reviews to achieve equivalence with the original English version. Interviews with clinicians who were currently managing patients with stroke were also conducted for language evaluation. A reliability test was performed to make final adaptation using a pre-final version. To assess the reliability of the translated questionnaire, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for each domain of the scale. RESULTS: Thirty subjects (16 male, 14 female) aged from 20 to 75 years old participated to review the translated questionnaire. Reliability of each domain of the questionnaire was found to be good in strength (ICC=0.74), ADL (ICC=0.81),mobility (ICC=0.90), hand function (ICC=0.80) and social participation (ICC=0.79), communication (ICC=0.77) with total (ICC=0.76). However, domains of memory and thinking (ICC=0.66), and emotion (ICC=0.27) and showed poor reliability. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that the Korean version of SIS 3.0 was successfully developed. Future study needed for obtaining the validity of the Korean version of SIS 3.0.
  • 7.

    Effects of Balance Training on Different Support Surface on Balance and Gait in Patients with Chronic Stroke

    공해나 | 방대혁 | Shin Won Seob | 2015, 10(3) | pp.275~283 | number of Cited : 8
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of balance training on different support surface (affected and non-affected sides) on the balance and gait function of chronic stroke patients. METHODS: The patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups. Group 1 received balance training on the stable surface, group 2 received balance training on the unstable surface, group 3 received balance training on different support surface (affected side: stable surface, non-affected side: unstable surface), and group 4 received balance training on different support surface (affected side: unstable, non-affected side: stable). Twelve sessions (30 min/d, 3 times/wk for 4 wk) were applied. There were assessed before and after the intervention with Balancia, functional reach test (FRT), lateral reach test (LRT), timed up-and-go (TUG), and 10-meter walking test (10MWT). RESULTS: After the training, all of the groups improved significantly than before training in Balancia, FRT, LRT, TUG, and 10MWT. There were significantly variable in sway distance, FRT, LRT, TUG, and 10MWT among the 4 groups. Post hoc analysis revealed that the group 3 had significantly higher results than other 3 groups in sway distance, and FRT, LRT, TUG, and 10MWT. CONCLUSION: Balance training on different support surface (affected side: stable surface, non-affected side: unstable surface) could facilitate a stronger beneficial effect on balance and walking ability than other balance trainings on different support surface in patients with stroke.
  • 8.

    The effects of motion taping on young males’ lumbar stabilization exercise

    Yongho Cho | choi jin ho | 2015, 10(3) | pp.285~290 | number of Cited : 2
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: This study was conducted to examine the effects of motion taping on the effects of lumbar stabilization exercise. METHODS: The subjects of this study were 24 normal males with no problem in their nervous systems or musculoskeletal systems. The subjects were randomly assigned to a control group of 12 subjects and an experimental group of 12 subjects. The control group was applied with lumbar stabilization exercise while the experimental group was applied with lumbar stabilization exercise after being attached with tapes. The intervention period was four weeks in total and the subject underwent the exercises three times per week. The exercise time per session was set to one hour in principle consisting of warm-up exercise and cool-down exercise for 10 minutes each and main exercise for 40 minutes. Lumbar muscle strength was measured as a factor to examine the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises. RESULTS: The control group showed an increase in lumbar muscle strength from 111±6.30kg to 113±6.23kg and the experimental group showed an increase in lumbar muscle strength from 108±6.46kg to 116±5.21kg. The increases shown by both groups were statistically significant and the experimental group that was applied with motion taping showed a larger increase in lumbar muscle strength compared to the control group. CONCLUSION: Lumbar stabilization exercise is considered to be good for lumbar stability and muscle strengthening and lumbar stabilization exercise applied with motion taping is considered to show larger effects for muscle strengthening and the improvement of lumbar functions.
  • 9.

    Comparison of Walking in Elderly People and Adults Using a Walker Aid with a Pocket Attachment

    Sung-won Kwag | 신은지 | 박정욱 and 1other persons | 2015, 10(3) | pp.291~297 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: This study aims to examine the impact of the location of a walker-aid pocket that is attached to the walker while walking. METHODS: The research subjects included 10 male adults and 10 elderly people. The subjects used a twowheeled walker for the walking analysis, and a firm velcro-type pocket that can be attached to the walker aid was used for weight loading. The size of the external loads was set at 2kg, which corresponds to approximately 2.5% of the mean body weight of the subjects. The pocket was attached to the left, center, and right sides of the walker aid. Stride length, stride, step width, and time were investigated according to the location change. RESULTS: No statistical differences were observed in all the walking factors among the adults and elderly people regardless of the changes in the location of the walker pocket. In cases of no weight and the 2kg walker pocket, stride length and strides were longer for the adults, while the step width was greater and walking time was longer for the elderly people. CONCLUSION: The weight of the walker pocket turn out to retard walking speed, although the location of the walker pocket is not affect walking with the walker-aid.
  • 10.

    Trunk Muscle Activation during Bridge Exercise with Various Shoulder Supporting Surfaces

    Ho-Hee Son | 2015, 10(3) | pp.299~304 | number of Cited : 6
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: Bridge exercises are broadly used to develop trunk co-activation patterns that promote spine stability. This study was to analyze the trunk muscle activity during bridge exercise with various shoulder support surface(stable, sling, Swiss ball). METHODS: The subjects were 20 healthy subjects in their twenties. Subjects were performed bridge exercise on 4 different shoulder support surfaces using stable and labile instruments. 1) Bridge exercise on a stable surface. 2) Bridge exercise with their shoulder on a stable bench. 3) Bridge exercise with their shoulder on a sling. 4) Bridge exercise with their shoulder on a Swiss ball. Rectus abdominis, erector spinae, internal oblique, external oblique muscle activities were measured using electromyography. RESULTS: There were significant differences in RA, EO muscles between performing each of the 4 exercises(p<.05). RA and EO was recorded the highest activity during the bridge exercise with their shoulder on a sling. The lowest activity was recorded during conventional supine bridge on a stable surface. There were no differences found for the EO/RA and IO/RA ratio. The EO/RA and IO/RA ratio was the highest in the bridge exercise with their shoulders resting on a stable bench. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that change of shoulder support surface during bridge exercise may be useful for enhancing the trunk stability.
  • 11.

    Comparisons of lower extremity strength, cognition, and ankle mobility according to the 8.5seconds cut-off point for the 8-foot up-and-go test in elderly women

    kang moon sun | 김영미 | 이경순 | 2015, 10(3) | pp.305~311 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the 8.5seconds cut-off of the 8-foot up-and-go test as a predictor of falling and a good discriminator of fallers and non-fallers in women in their 60s to 80s. METHODS: The final subjects of this study were 98 elderly women from six senior centers of B metropolitan city. The 8-foot up-and-go test evaluated agility and dynamic balance. The chair-stand test measured the muscle strength for of the lower body. Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion were measured to assess the ankle mobility of the subjects in this study. RESULTS: The below 8.5seconds group showed significantly low values in age and high values in chair- stand (times/30 s), plantar flexion (°), and K-MMSE (score) compared to the over 8.5seconds group. This group was significantly faster compared to the over 8.5seconds group. In the below 8.5seconds group, only plantar flexion (°) of all the items showed significantly higher values among those in their 60s compared to those in their 70s and 80s. CONCLUSION: The 8.5seconds cut-off on the 8-foot up-and-go test as a good discriminator and predictor of falling showed differences among fall risk factors (age, lower extremity strength, cognition, and ankle mobility) in women in their 60s to 80s without having regular exercise and a fall experience over the past ones year.
  • 12.

    The effects of the angles of the knee and heel-off on the muscle activity during a bridge exercise

    Kim Byung Jo | LEE SU KYOUNG | Lee Jung Hoon and 1other persons | 2015, 10(3) | pp.313~318 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the angles of the knee and heel-off on the muscle activity during a bridge exercise. METHODS: 15 healthy adult men and women with the balance ability and joint working range required for performing a bridge exercise participated in this study, in which 120°, 90° and 60° angles of the knee-flexion and heel-off were applied during the bridge exercise. RESULTS: Our data showed that there were significant differences in muscle activities of elector spinae and rectus abdominis when 120°and 60°angles of the knee were applied, of internal oblique when 120°and 60°were applied, and external oblique when 90°and 60°were applied. When heel-off was applied, there were significant differences in muscle activities of elector spinae and rectus abdominis when 120°and 60°were applied, of internal oblique when 120°and 60°were applied, and external oblique when 90°and 60°were applied. CONCLUSION: In this study on an application of heel-off to the bridge exercise, we showed that the effect of the angles of the knee on the muscle activities of elector spinae, rectus abdominis, internal oblique and external oblique were all similar to the regular bridge exercise, but overall muscle activities were increased with heel-off when compared with the regular bridge exercise.
  • 13.

    The effects of elbow joint angle and resistance point on muscle activation of the contralateral shoulder muscles while performing the ulnar thrust PNF pattern exercise

    Bok-gi Yeo | Han, Dong-wook | 2015, 10(3) | pp.319~326 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract
    PURPOSE: This study researched the effects of the changes of elbow joint angle and of arm position in PNF pattern on muscle activation of the contralateral shoulder muscles while performing PNF pattern exercise. METHODS: The research subjects were 16 male physical therapists who had no neuromuscular or neurological disorders. To measure the muscle activation of the contralateral shoulder muscles, EMG electrodes were attached to the muscle valley of the middle and posterior areas of the deltoid and triceps muscles of the arm. Muscle activation while performing the ulnar thrust PNF pattern exercise was measured with the elbow joint positioned at angles of 30°, 45°, and 60°. Resistance points were at the initial, middle, and end ranges of PNF pattern exercise. RESULTS: Muscle activation of the middle and posterior portions of the deltoid muscle increased significantly according to the changes of elbow joint angle. In each resistance point the middle range was significantly higher than at other points. A significant difference on muscle activation was demonstrated throughout each range depending on the type of muscle. Muscle activation of the middle and posterior portions of the deltoid muscle was higher than muscle activation of the triceps. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrate that the PNF pattern exercising method used in this study is a selective exercising method focusing on the deltoid muscle over the triceps muscle. In order to increase the muscle strength to the maximum level, it is necessary to provide the maximum level of resistance in the middle range of the elbow joint.