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pISSN : 1738-463X / eISSN : 2734-0112

2020 KCI Impact Factor : 2.11
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2020, Vol.17, No.2

  • 1.

    The Validation of Korean Student Career Construction Inventory: Focusing on emerging adulthood

    Sohwi Pyo | Yang Eun-Joo | 2020, 17(2) | pp.145~164 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    This study aims to validate the Korean Student Career Construction Inventory, a translated measure of career adaptation responses, with Korean college students. In order to do so, this study examines the relevant factor structure, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, criterion-related validity and measurement invariance between Korean undergraduate and graduate students. An online survey was completed by 294 participants, including the questions from the translated Korean Student Career Construction Inventory, in addition to measures of career adaptability and vocational identity. One hundred twenty five among the initial participants were tested again in three months for the examination of test-retest reliability. The results supported the four-factor structure of 18 items suggested by the original measure, as well as measurement invariance. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability were adequate. The Korean Student Career Construction Inventory was positively correlated with career adaptability, unidimensional vocational identity, and the dimensions of exploration and commitment of multidimensional vocational identity, but negatively with the dimension of reconsideration. The findings indicate that the Korean Student Career Construction Inventory has psychometric properties similar to the original form and can be used for both undergraduate and graduate students.
  • 2.

    Development and Validation of the Korean Tier 3 School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Implementation Fidelity Checklist (KT3-FC)

    Sung-Doo Won | Eun JIn Chang | Kwang-Sun Cho Blair and 2other persons | 2020, 17(2) | pp.165~180 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    As a tiered system of supports, School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) is an evidence-based practice in the educational system of Korea. An important aspect of SWPBS is the ongoing progress monitoring and evaluation of implementation fidelity. This study aimed to develop and validate the Korean Tier 3 School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Implementation Fidelity Checklist (KT3-FC). The preliminary KT3-FC consisted of a 37-item, 6-factor checklist. In the first phase of the study, 10 experts reported that the range of content validity of the KT3-FC was adequate. In the second phase of the study, 185 teachers (52 men and 133 women) who implemented SWPBS completed the KT3-FC, Individualized Supports Questionnaire, School Climate Questionnaire, School Discipline Practice Scale, and PBS Effectiveness Scale. An exploratory factor analysis resulted in a 5-factor structure, with 20 items, instead of 37 items, consisting of: (a) progress monitoring and evaluation of the individualized supports, (b) provision of supports by aligning and integrating mental health and SWPBS, (c) crisis management planning, (d) problem behavior assessment, and (e) establishment of individualized support team. The internal consistency of the KT3-FC was good (full scale α = .950, sub-factor α = .888 ~ .954). In addition, the KT3-FC showed good convergent validity, having statistically significant correlations with the Individualized Support Questionnaire, School Climate Questionnaire, School Discipline Practice Scale, and the PBS Effectiveness Scale. Finally, the confirmatory factor analysis showed that the 5-factor model of the KT3-FC had some good model fits, indicating that the newly developed fidelity measure could be a reliable and valid tool to assess the implementation of Tier 3 supports in Korean schools. Accordingly, the KT3-FC could contribute to implement SWPBS as an evidence-based behavioral intervention for Korean students.
  • 3.

    Double mediation effects of cognitive emotion regulation strategy and conflict resolution strategy on the association between rejection sensitivity and dating relationship satisfaction

    eunyoung koh | Mikyung Kim | 2020, 17(2) | pp.181~198 | number of Cited : 0
    Abstract PDF
    This study examined how the rejection sensitivity model might be applied to the link between rejection sensitivity and dating relationship satisfaction by means of investigating the mediating effect of cognitive emotion regulation strategy and conflict resolution strategy. A total of 668 college students in Seoul (232 males, 436 females, mean age of 21.59 years [SD=2.08]) participated in this study. The results illustrated that the adaptive emotion regulation strategy, among cognitive emotion regulation strategies, and the integration and compromise strategies, among conflict resolution strategies, had the double mediation effect on the association between rejection sensitivity and dating relationship satisfaction. In other words, a direct negative correlation between rejection sensitivity and dating relationship satisfation resulted in high rejection sensitivity, which was expected to generate low satisfaction in dating relationships. However, it was confirmed that the use of these two strategies-the cognitive emotion regulation and the conflict resolution strategy-could bring positive effects in terms of the dating relationship satisfaction; the former helped couples to see situations more broadly and increase positive perceptions, while the latter solve their problems each other. Based on these findings, we discuss their implications for counseling practice and therapeutic interventions
  • 4.

    The Effect of Socially Prescribed Perfectionism of University Student to Depression: Focusing on the Mediating Effects of Intolerance of Uncertainty and Rumination, Reflective Response Style

    JAE GWANG CHOI | Wonyoung Song | 2020, 17(2) | pp.199~222 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    This study was conducted to verify the effects of socially prescribed perfectionism on depression as mediated by intolerance of uncertainty and either ruminating or reflective response styles, on as will as to find ways to effectively address depression as it presents in university students. For this purpose, 283 university students at the central region were assesed using data collected from the following surveys: the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale(CES-D), the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale(HMPS), the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale(IUS), and the Response to Depressed Mood Questionnaire(RDQ) and that were used to collect data. The results of this study are as follows. First, there was a positive correlation between the Intolerance of uncertainty and the rumination response style to the uncertainty of socially prescribed perfectionism, but not correlation the reflective response mode. Second, with respect to the relationship between socially prescribed perfectionism and depression, intolerance of uncertainty was set as the primary mediator variable and the rumination response style were set as the secondary mediator variables. The results shown to have a significant mediating effects. However this mediating effect was not significant when, in order to verify the mediating effect, we set the secondary mediator variable as the reflective response style. These results suggest that to prevent depression that manifests as socially prescribed perfectionism, it may be effective to intervene with a focus on the intolerance of uncertainty and the rumination response style. Finally, the implications and limitations of the study are discussed based on the results.
  • 5.

    Classifying the Latent Group of Elementary School Students Based on Social Achievement Goals Types and the Exploration of Peer Status and Aggression

    CHOI EUN YOUNG | 2020, 17(2) | pp.223~241 | number of Cited : 1
    Abstract PDF
    The purpose of this study was to explore the latent profiles of social achievement goals and to investigate the differences in peer status (perceived popularity, social preference) and aggression (overt, relational, cyber) among those profile groups. Social achievement goals and cyber aggression data was acquired through self-reporting, and perceived popularity, social preference, and overt and relational aggression were assessed through peer nomination. Applying the latent profile analysis(LPA) to 1,239 elementary school students, three distinct groups of social achievement goals were identified: a development-oriented achievement goal group, an average social goal group, and a overall-high social achievement goal group. Using logistic regression analysis, the relationships between the latent group, peer status, and aggression were examined. The result indicated that the higher the social preference, the lower the probability of belonging to the ‘overall-high social achievement goal group’. And the higher the cyber aggression, the lower the probability of belonging to the ‘development-oriented achievement goal group’. In addition, the higher the relational aggression of the second time, the higher the probability of belonging to the ‘overall-high social achievement goal group’ as compared to the ‘average social goal group’.